This is not
an ordinary
photograph.

Its resolution is 2,523% greater than
a typical fine art photograph.

It is one of the highest quality images
ever created.

SHOP
551 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo of a New England harbor with boats at sunset; fine art landscape photograph created by Aaron Priest in Seal Harbor, Maine

Seal Harbor at Sunset: Cropped

An Exceptionally High Resolution Fine Art PhotoAn Exceptionally High Resolution
Fine Art Photo

This 551-megapixel VAST photo is one of the highest definition fine art photographs ever created, with a resolution equivalent to 266 full-HD TVs.

STORY
EXPLORE & BUY  

LIMITED EDITION OF 75  

$ -

$ -

$ -

$ -

$ -

$ -

$ -

$ -

SEE IN PERSON

Questions?  Ask us  

A lot of effort goes into a VAST photo, especially at sunset with rapidly changing light and in a harbor with moving boats and waves. There are several stages of work to any good photo: planning, shooting, post-processing, printing / display, and with panoramas you have to add stitching and blending of course. The planning phase is probably the most critical for a successful stitch later though. Location and time of day are obviously two important steps of planning, as is choosing your subject and field of view to know what focal length and aperture would best isolate your subject or place your subject in its environment. You may even have several subjects in a wide landscape. In this scene, the color of the sky, the reflection on the water, and the people getting off the boat on the pier were what I chose to be my focus. I let the railing and edge of shoreline be the natural border of the scene. I don’t always center my horizon line, but for a reflection it emphasizes the mirrored effect and it juxtaposed the dipping arch of the boats in the foreground lined up left to center below the horizon and the rising arch of the hill in the background from center to right above the horizon. The swooping S through the scene helps break up the centered horizon line.

Next was choosing my focal length, once I knew how much of the scene I was going to shoot. The horizontal angle of view was 160° wide, and it would take a non-existent 3.2mm lens to cover such an extreme angle, so it goes without saying that stitching multiple photos was obviously going to be the answer. But what focal length? 40mm would have covered the vertical field of view with a single row in portrait orientation and taken 6 images to reach 158° wide with a 25% overlap, but the resolution would only be 167 megapixels and I wanted much more detail, especially of the people on the distant dock. On the other hand, at 200mm it would have taken 31 columns of 6 rows for a total of 186 images and the stitched panorama would be 4.3 gigapixels, but I didn’t feel I had enough time with the people leaving the dock and setting sun to capture that many images. I also had moving boats and waves to contend with. In the end, I settled on 110mm and here’s the critical reason why: it captured the full mast and reflection of the tallest boat in the harbor in a single image, which would make masking and deghosting MUCH easier in post-production later when stitching and blending. It also meant I could capture the entire scene in 51 images (17 columns of 3 rows) before the light disappeared. I turned every 10° horizontally and 15° vertically for about a 39% horizontal overlap and 38% vertical overlap so I would have plenty of material for blending and deghosting moving boats and waves. It took about 6 minutes to capture all the images so the light was fairly consistent and the clouds didn’t move far. I started in the lower left hand corner and zigzagged so I would be shooting the darkest area first and the brightest area last for more even lighting, since the light was fading and the scene was getting darker. I would do the opposite for a sunrise panorama. The final, cropped image wound up being 65899 x 19926 or 1.3 gigapixels, so it was a good compromise and I still hit my goal of a gigapixel.

The hyperfocal distance of a 110mm lens at f/8 is 50m where everything from 25m to infinity should be acceptably sharp. This assumes a much smaller print size than zooming into 100% in a VAST photo though. I probably should have chosen at least f/11 or f/13 for more depth of field, but I was also down to 1/20 shutter speed and up to ISO 200 for an exposure and I didn’t want to raise my ISO to 2500. I couldn’t go with a longer shutter speed either without blurred boats from the waves. So I chose f/8, focused on a boat in the middle of the harbor (30m away), took a couple near and far test shots, and confirmed it was an acceptable compromise. Everything in photography is a compromise, as Joe DiMaggio is fond of saying!

Camera settings: 110mm, f/8, ISO 200, 1/20

Stitching data: 3 rows of 17 images.

Equipment used: Nikon D810, Nikon 70-200mm f/2.8 VR II, Promote Control, and Really Right Stuff TVC-34L tripod w/ leveling base & pano/gimbal head. RAW conversion in Lightroom, aligned with PTGui, and manually blended via masks in Photoshop. Planned with PhotoPills.

CLOSE-UPS

Stunning image clarity

This 551-megapixel VAST photo is one of the highest definition fine art photographs ever created. It has a resolution equivalent to 266 full-HD TVs.


Explore the photo by clicking on the boxes

TECH SPECS

EXPOSURE SPECS

Date & TimeJuly 31, 2016:  8:05pm
LocationSeal Harbor, Maine
Coordinates44.293556, -68.237776
CameraNikon D810
Megapixels per Exposure36.3
LensNikkor 70-200mm f/2.8G ED VR II
Focal Length110mm
Aperturef/8
Shutter Speed1/20
ISO200
Number of Exposures51

FILE SPECS

Total Pixels550,588,928
Horizontal Pixels33,184
Vertical Pixels16,592
Aspect Ratio1 : 2
File Size3.15 GB
Width @ 300ppi (perfect)9.22 feet
Height @ 300ppi4.61 feet
Width @ 150ppi (near-perfect)18.44 feet
Height @ 150ppi9.22 feet
Nikon D810
Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8G ED VR II
Nikon D810
Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8G ED VR II
VAST PRINTS

THE HIGHEST RESOLUTION PHOTOGRAPHIC PRINTS EVER CREATED

VAST Prints are fine art photographic paper prints that arrive ready to be mounted and/or framed. They are created using the sharpest photographic printer in commercial use: a very rare specialty printer that formerly printed currency and military surveillance imagery.  Learn more  

Every VAST Print has two certificates of authenticity hand-signed by the artist and the printmaker: one affixed to the print and one standalone. Additionally, each print is assigned a unique serial number via a permanent hologram seal and recorded in our registry. Its provenance is tracked and verified using state-of-the-art digital blockchain encryption technology.

VAST DISPLAYS

THE HIGHEST QUALITY PHOTOGRAPHIC DISPLAYS EVER CREATED

VAST Displays are ready-to-hang works of art that contain a VAST Print sealed between flame-polished acrylic glass and an aluminum backing. A hidden brace on the back causes the display to gracefully float off the wall for a sleek, modern frameless look that complements nearly any decor style.  Learn more  

SIZING GUIDE

A one-of-a-kind conversation starter

This VAST photo becomes a stunning conversation-starter wherever it's showcased. It's offered in 4 large-format sizes:


42 in
21 in
54 in
27 in
72 in
36 in
96 in
48 in
LICENSES

TYPICAL PROFESSIONAL PHOTO

MAXIMUM PRINT SIZE WITHOUT QUALITY DEGRADATION:

19 in
10 in

THIS VAST PHOTO

MAXIMUM PRINT SIZE WITHOUT QUALITY DEGRADATION:

111 in
55 in

Contact one of our VAST experts to license this VAST photo:

Error: Please check your entries.
SIMILAR  PRIME  COLLECTION  PHOTOS
SIMILAR  OPEN  COLLECTION  PHOTOS
TAGS