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276 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of moss on a rock wall with some water running down it; nature photograph created by David David in Porcupine Mountains Wilderness State Park, Michigan.

MOUNTAIN TEARS

276 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Porcupine Mountains Wilderness, Michigan

I have spent a significant amount of time in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, especially the Porcupine Mountains, Pictured Rocks, and Tahquamenon Falls areas. Given that this is my home state it’s always nice to photograph its beauty, and it is beautiful.

It’s not called the Great Lake State for nothing. Water everywhere. The Upper Peninsula should probably be called The Great Waterfall Peninsula since water cascading and/or seeping, as depicted in this image “Mountain Tears”, can be found around every turn.

I photographed this image while on a multi-day backpack through the Porcupine Mountain Wilderness. It was an absolute glorious day when I produced this VAST Ultra High-Resolution Image. The trail I was on passed by an area of moss and moisture on stone walls that I thought looked quite interesting. I always think in terms of, “Would I want this imagery hanging over my couch?” and the answer here was an emphatic, “Yes!”

Title Origin: The title “Mountain Tears” can be interpreted a couple ways, I guess. But due to my completely enjoying the hike, the fantastic day that it was, and are you ready for this, those of you who may be familiar with the area … there were no mosquitoes! Unfortunately, with water, often comes mosquitoes. So, my interpretation of “Mountain Tears” is that these were not tears of sadness, but tears of immense joy. Especially for the no mosquitos part.

Thanks ... and thanks again,

David David

Life Is An Adventure!

Explore this photo

I have spent a significant amount of time in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, especially the Porcupine Mountains, Pictured Rocks, and Tahquamenon Falls areas. Given that this is my home state it’s always nice to photograph its beauty, and it is beautiful.

It’s not called the Great Lake State for nothing. Water everywhere. The Upper Peninsula should probably be called The Great Waterfall Peninsula since water cascading and/or seeping, as depicted in this image “Mountain Tears”, can be found around every turn.

I photographed this image while on a multi-day backpack through the Porcupine Mountain Wilderness. It was an absolute glorious day when I produced this VAST Ultra High-Resolution Image. The trail I was on passed by an area of moss and moisture on stone walls that I thought looked quite interesting. I always think in terms of, “Would I want this imagery hanging over my couch?” and the answer here was an emphatic, “Yes!”

Title Origin: The title “Mountain Tears” can be interpreted a couple ways, I guess. But due to my completely enjoying the hike, the fantastic day that it was, and are you ready for this, those of you who may be familiar with the area … there were no mosquitoes! Unfortunately, with water, often comes mosquitoes. So, my interpretation of “Mountain Tears” is that these were not tears of sadness, but tears of immense joy. Especially for the no mosquitos part.

Thanks ... and thanks again,

David David

Life Is An Adventure!

Explore this photo

276 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of a shipwreck in Lake Michigan; wall mural photograph created by David David at the Wreck Of The Francisco Morazan, South Manitou Island, Lake Michigan, Michigan.

SHIPWRECK SANCTUARY

276 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Wreck Of The Francisco Morazan, South Manitou Island, Lake Michigan, Michigan

The North and South Manitou Islands sit just off the coast of the Northern Lower Peninsula of Michigan. They’re located in the blue, salt-free waters of Lake Michigan and a part of the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore. The islands are surrounded by at least 50 known shipwrecks and it’s a popular area for diving.

I hopped the Manitou Island ferry intending to spend a week or so backpacking South Manitou. Although it was very late in the season the ferry was relatively packed with both backpackers and those on a day trip. First stop was North Manitou. Once docked I couldn’t help but notice that all the other backpackers disembarked. Not all that surprising since North Manitou is better known for its backpacking. The rest of the passengers, save myself, were all day-trippers heading for South Manitou.

My time on South Manitou was very productive from a photography standpoint. Once the day-trippers departed, I was left alone on the island except for the Park Ranger. I had three primary objectives, photograph the South Manitou Island Lighthouse, the endangered Piping Plover, and the Francisco Morazan shipwreck. I was able to accomplish everything I wanted to. Not without difficulty though.

My hike to the Francisco Morazan was brutal. The trail to the wreck that cut through the middle of the island was impassable. So, I had to improvise. I decided to take the shoreline. I spent about four hours negotiating a maze of fallen trees, rocky shoreline, and the necessity at times to wade chest deep in Lake Michigan. I’ve rarely been tempted to “Forget it” and bail on a hike, but I got close on this one.

In the end I stuck with it and produced what I’m pretty sure is the first and only Ultra High-Resolution Image of the Francisco Morazan shipwreck. And as a bonus, during the hike for about a half an hour I was attacked by a pair of bald eagles. I must have been a bit too close to where they were nesting. But, as I was mercilessly dive-bombed, I got some pretty good photos!

Title Origin: The Francisco Morazan shipwreck is a haven for the local Cormorants. It is indeed their “Shipwreck Sanctuary.”

Thanks ... and thanks again,

David David

Life Is An Adventure!

Explore this photo

The North and South Manitou Islands sit just off the coast of the Northern Lower Peninsula of Michigan. They’re located in the blue, salt-free waters of Lake Michigan and a part of the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore. The islands are surrounded by at least 50 known shipwrecks and it’s a popular area for diving.

I hopped the Manitou Island ferry intending to spend a week or so backpacking South Manitou. Although it was very late in the season the ferry was relatively packed with both backpackers and those on a day trip. First stop was North Manitou. Once docked I couldn’t help but notice that all the other backpackers disembarked. Not all that surprising since North Manitou is better known for its backpacking. The rest of the passengers, save myself, were all day-trippers heading for South Manitou.

My time on South Manitou was very productive from a photography standpoint. Once the day-trippers departed, I was left alone on the island except for the Park Ranger. I had three primary objectives, photograph the South Manitou Island Lighthouse, the endangered Piping Plover, and the Francisco Morazan shipwreck. I was able to accomplish everything I wanted to. Not without difficulty though.

My hike to the Francisco Morazan was brutal. The trail to the wreck that cut through the middle of the island was impassable. So, I had to improvise. I decided to take the shoreline. I spent about four hours negotiating a maze of fallen trees, rocky shoreline, and the necessity at times to wade chest deep in Lake Michigan. I’ve rarely been tempted to “Forget it” and bail on a hike, but I got close on this one.

In the end I stuck with it and produced what I’m pretty sure is the first and only Ultra High-Resolution Image of the Francisco Morazan shipwreck. And as a bonus, during the hike for about a half an hour I was attacked by a pair of bald eagles. I must have been a bit too close to where they were nesting. But, as I was mercilessly dive-bombed, I got some pretty good photos!

Title Origin: The Francisco Morazan shipwreck is a haven for the local Cormorants. It is indeed their “Shipwreck Sanctuary.”

Thanks ... and thanks again,

David David

Life Is An Adventure!

Explore this photo

1,659 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of the Angels Landing rock formation in Zion National Park at sunset; photograph created by David David in Angels Landing, Zion National Park, Utah.

IN THE COMPANY OF ANGELS: CROPPED

1,659 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Angels Landing, Zion National Park, Utah

Visiting Zion National Park is comparably what it feels like to be inside the Grand Canyon. While the typical visitor to the Grand Canyon spends most of their time on the rim, the primary visitor areas in Zion National Park are in Zion Canyon.

Zion is a beautiful and marvelous National Park with a lot to offer. Two of the most popular hikes are The Narrows and Angels Landing. But these can both be challenging hikes and every year visitors perish on one hike or the other. So pay attention to notifications, primarily as they relate to inclement weather.

The Narrows tracks up the Virgin River (the river IS the trail) where the further you go, the more closed in the canyon becomes as the walls “narrow” in on you. As with a lot of hikes, the safe aspect of this hike is that you can progress as far as you’re comfortable, then turn around and go back. The danger here is flash flooding.

Most of Angels Landing is relatively easy and you can hike up to what’s called the “Chain Section”, call it a day and go back. The Chain Section is where it can get difficult and dangerous, particularly for those afraid of heights and/or not wearing the proper footwear. The times I’ve hiked Angels Landing I’ve seen a lot of people on the Chain Section that shouldn’t be there.

I’ve arrived at the beginning of the Chain Section and witnessed intense arguments between family members and/or hiking buddies along the lines of, “Come on, you can do it”. To which the trying-to-be-coerced family member and/or hiking buddy vehemently responds “No, no, are you crazy? There’s not a chance I’m going up there!” And variations thereof. I’ve also been on parts of the Chain Section and witnessed people in the fetal position agonizingly sobbing while family members and/or hiking buddies try to console them saying things like, “Okay, you were right, we don’t have to do this. We must have been crazy to even think of it!” To which the distressed family member and/or hiking buddy responds, “I hate you!” And variations thereof. The danger here is in not only falling, but family members and/or hiking buddies talking you into something you don’t want to do, or even worse, shouldn’t do.

Although personally I find the Chain Section of Angels Landing not difficult at all, it always garners my respect. Well, I guess most of the time. I did once traverse it in the freezing cold, while snowing, with the Chain Section covered in ice. And yes, I admit it. It was stupid! And what makes it worse is that I didn’t have any family members and/or hiking buddies trying their best to coerce me. I did it of my own free, stupid, will. I did have the top all to myself though ... wink, wink.

Title Origin: One of the best rim locations in Zion National Park is Observation Point. That is where this VAST Ultra High-Resolution Image was produced. It provides a great view of Zion Canyon and somewhat reminds me of Tunnel View in Yosemite. There’s too much to point out in the image in the way of landmarks, but first and foremost is that it's looking down on Angels Landing, where you are indeed, “In The Company Of Angels.”

The detail in this image is such that one can see hikers on the Chain Section, in the distance Zion Lodge, hikers on various other trails, and even some deer grazing along the roadside. Experience Zion in all its splendor, including the Chain Section of Angels Landing by purchasing this VAST Ultra High-resolution Image. Proper footwear not required.

Thanks ... and thanks again,

David David

Life Is An Adventure!

Explore this photo

Visiting Zion National Park is comparably what it feels like to be inside the Grand Canyon. While the typical visitor to the Grand Canyon spends most of their time on the rim, the primary visitor areas in Zion National Park are in Zion Canyon.

Zion is a beautiful and marvelous National Park with a lot to offer. Two of the most popular hikes are The Narrows and Angels Landing. But these can both be challenging hikes and every year visitors perish on one hike or the other. So pay attention to notifications, primarily as they relate to inclement weather.

The Narrows tracks up the Virgin River (the river IS the trail) where the further you go, the more closed in the canyon becomes as the walls “narrow” in on you. As with a lot of hikes, the safe aspect of this hike is that you can progress as far as you’re comfortable, then turn around and go back. The danger here is flash flooding.

Most of Angels Landing is relatively easy and you can hike up to what’s called the “Chain Section”, call it a day and go back. The Chain Section is where it can get difficult and dangerous, particularly for those afraid of heights and/or not wearing the proper footwear. The times I’ve hiked Angels Landing I’ve seen a lot of people on the Chain Section that shouldn’t be there.

I’ve arrived at the beginning of the Chain Section and witnessed intense arguments between family members and/or hiking buddies along the lines of, “Come on, you can do it”. To which the trying-to-be-coerced family member and/or hiking buddy vehemently responds “No, no, are you crazy? There’s not a chance I’m going up there!” And variations thereof. I’ve also been on parts of the Chain Section and witnessed people in the fetal position agonizingly sobbing while family members and/or hiking buddies try to console them saying things like, “Okay, you were right, we don’t have to do this. We must have been crazy to even think of it!” To which the distressed family member and/or hiking buddy responds, “I hate you!” And variations thereof. The danger here is in not only falling, but family members and/or hiking buddies talking you into something you don’t want to do, or even worse, shouldn’t do.

Although personally I find the Chain Section of Angels Landing not difficult at all, it always garners my respect. Well, I guess most of the time. I did once traverse it in the freezing cold, while snowing, with the Chain Section covered in ice. And yes, I admit it. It was stupid! And what makes it worse is that I didn’t have any family members and/or hiking buddies trying their best to coerce me. I did it of my own free, stupid, will. I did have the top all to myself though ... wink, wink.

Title Origin: One of the best rim locations in Zion National Park is Observation Point. That is where this VAST Ultra High-Resolution Image was produced. It provides a great view of Zion Canyon and somewhat reminds me of Tunnel View in Yosemite. There’s too much to point out in the image in the way of landmarks, but first and foremost is that it's looking down on Angels Landing, where you are indeed, “In The Company Of Angels.”

The detail in this image is such that one can see hikers on the Chain Section, in the distance Zion Lodge, hikers on various other trails, and even some deer grazing along the roadside. Experience Zion in all its splendor, including the Chain Section of Angels Landing by purchasing this VAST Ultra High-resolution Image. Proper footwear not required.

Thanks ... and thanks again,

David David

Life Is An Adventure!

Explore this photo

2,276 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of the Angels Landing rock formation in Zion National Park at sunset; photograph created by David David in Angels Landing, Zion National Park, Utah.

IN THE COMPANY OF ANGELS

2,276 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Angels Landing, Zion National Park, Utah

Visiting Zion National Park is comparably what it feels like to be inside the Grand Canyon. While the typical visitor to the Grand Canyon spends most of their time on the rim, the primary visitor areas in Zion National Park are in Zion Canyon.

Zion is a beautiful and marvelous National Park with a lot to offer. Two of the most popular hikes are The Narrows and Angels Landing. But these can both be challenging hikes and every year visitors perish on one hike or the other. So pay attention to notifications, primarily as they relate to inclement weather.

The Narrows tracks up the Virgin River (the river IS the trail) where the further you go, the more closed in the canyon becomes as the walls “narrow” in on you. As with a lot of hikes, the safe aspect of this hike is that you can progress as far as you’re comfortable, then turn around and go back. The danger here is flash flooding.

Most of Angels Landing is relatively easy and you can hike up to what’s called the “Chain Section”, call it a day and go back. The Chain Section is where it can get difficult and dangerous, particularly for those afraid of heights and/or not wearing the proper footwear. The times I’ve hiked Angels Landing I’ve seen a lot of people on the Chain Section that shouldn’t be there.

I’ve arrived at the beginning of the Chain Section and witnessed intense arguments between family members and/or hiking buddies along the lines of, “Come on, you can do it”. To which the trying-to-be-coerced family member and/or hiking buddy vehemently responds “No, no, are you crazy? There’s not a chance I’m going up there!” And variations thereof. I’ve also been on parts of the Chain Section and witnessed people in the fetal position agonizingly sobbing while family members and/or hiking buddies try to console them saying things like, “Okay, you were right, we don’t have to do this. We must have been crazy to even think of it!” To which the distressed family member and/or hiking buddy responds, “I hate you!” And variations thereof. The danger here is in not only falling, but family members and/or hiking buddies talking you into something you don’t want to do, or even worse, shouldn’t do.

Although personally I find the Chain Section of Angels Landing not difficult at all, it always garners my respect. Well, I guess most of the time. I did once traverse it in the freezing cold, while snowing, with the Chain Section covered in ice. And yes, I admit it. It was stupid! And what makes it worse is that I didn’t have any family members and/or hiking buddies trying their best to coerce me. I did it of my own free, stupid, will. I did have the top all to myself though ... wink, wink.

Title Origin: One of the best rim locations in Zion National Park is Observation Point. That is where this VAST Ultra High-Resolution Image was produced. It provides a great view of Zion Canyon and somewhat reminds me of Tunnel View in Yosemite. There’s too much to point out in the image in the way of landmarks, but first and foremost is that it's looking down on Angels Landing, where you are indeed, “In The Company Of Angels.”

The detail in this image is such that one can see hikers on the Chain Section, in the distance Zion Lodge, hikers on various other trails, and even some deer grazing along the roadside. Experience Zion in all its splendor, including the Chain Section of Angels Landing by purchasing this VAST Ultra High-resolution Image. Proper footwear not required.

Thanks ... and thanks again,

David David

Life Is An Adventure!

Explore this photo

Visiting Zion National Park is comparably what it feels like to be inside the Grand Canyon. While the typical visitor to the Grand Canyon spends most of their time on the rim, the primary visitor areas in Zion National Park are in Zion Canyon.

Zion is a beautiful and marvelous National Park with a lot to offer. Two of the most popular hikes are The Narrows and Angels Landing. But these can both be challenging hikes and every year visitors perish on one hike or the other. So pay attention to notifications, primarily as they relate to inclement weather.

The Narrows tracks up the Virgin River (the river IS the trail) where the further you go, the more closed in the canyon becomes as the walls “narrow” in on you. As with a lot of hikes, the safe aspect of this hike is that you can progress as far as you’re comfortable, then turn around and go back. The danger here is flash flooding.

Most of Angels Landing is relatively easy and you can hike up to what’s called the “Chain Section”, call it a day and go back. The Chain Section is where it can get difficult and dangerous, particularly for those afraid of heights and/or not wearing the proper footwear. The times I’ve hiked Angels Landing I’ve seen a lot of people on the Chain Section that shouldn’t be there.

I’ve arrived at the beginning of the Chain Section and witnessed intense arguments between family members and/or hiking buddies along the lines of, “Come on, you can do it”. To which the trying-to-be-coerced family member and/or hiking buddy vehemently responds “No, no, are you crazy? There’s not a chance I’m going up there!” And variations thereof. I’ve also been on parts of the Chain Section and witnessed people in the fetal position agonizingly sobbing while family members and/or hiking buddies try to console them saying things like, “Okay, you were right, we don’t have to do this. We must have been crazy to even think of it!” To which the distressed family member and/or hiking buddy responds, “I hate you!” And variations thereof. The danger here is in not only falling, but family members and/or hiking buddies talking you into something you don’t want to do, or even worse, shouldn’t do.

Although personally I find the Chain Section of Angels Landing not difficult at all, it always garners my respect. Well, I guess most of the time. I did once traverse it in the freezing cold, while snowing, with the Chain Section covered in ice. And yes, I admit it. It was stupid! And what makes it worse is that I didn’t have any family members and/or hiking buddies trying their best to coerce me. I did it of my own free, stupid, will. I did have the top all to myself though ... wink, wink.

Title Origin: One of the best rim locations in Zion National Park is Observation Point. That is where this VAST Ultra High-Resolution Image was produced. It provides a great view of Zion Canyon and somewhat reminds me of Tunnel View in Yosemite. There’s too much to point out in the image in the way of landmarks, but first and foremost is that it's looking down on Angels Landing, where you are indeed, “In The Company Of Angels.”

The detail in this image is such that one can see hikers on the Chain Section, in the distance Zion Lodge, hikers on various other trails, and even some deer grazing along the roadside. Experience Zion in all its splendor, including the Chain Section of Angels Landing by purchasing this VAST Ultra High-resolution Image. Proper footwear not required.

Thanks ... and thanks again,

David David

Life Is An Adventure!

Explore this photo

936 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of the Jacobite railroad train steam locomotive going across the Glenfinnan Viaduct railroad bridge; photograph created by Scott Dimond in Glenfinnan Viaduct, United Kingdom

The Jacobite 44871 on the Glenfinnan Viaduct: Cropped

936 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Glenfinnan Viaduct, United Kingdom

Is this a photo of the Hogwarts Express? And is Harry Potter on board? The answer is no, but it certainly was the Harry Potter movies that made these steam trains and this viaduct famous. The Jacobite Steam Trains have in fact been running between Fort William and Mallaig and crossing Glenfinnan Viaduct since 1984. Located in the Scottish West Highlands, the Glenfinnan Viaduct was completed in 1898 and was built from concrete with 21 semicircular spans of 50 feet along its 416 yards.

On my recent trip to Scotland, I identified several locations at which I wanted to try and create an ultra-high-resolution VAST photo. With the well-known Scottish weather, “try” was all I could hope for. It would not be possible to stay at each location for a week waiting for perfect weather, so I knew I would have to work within the conditions at any given location on any given day.

One such location on my list was the famous Jacobite Steam Train crossing the equally famous Glenfinnan Viaduct. Since the Harry Potter movies, the site has become a popular tourist stop and has been photographed endlessly but what I have never seen was an ultra-high-resolution image with a train on the viaduct. So that was my quest. A “regular” photo or “regular” panoramic would not do. But unlike a static mountain or meadow, where the digital camera is repositioned across the scene with overlapping photos taken at each position and then later stitched together, this scene would present a new challenge with a train racing through it. The train needed to be captured in its entirety with its motion frozen. Shooting the entire scene in a single exposure on film was one option but I did not plan on hauling my large panoramic film camera to Scotland and even then, it would not capture the scene with the ultra-high-resolution I was looking for. So, in the weeks before my trip began, I formulated a plan on how I hoped to pull off the inclusion of the speeding train. On the day in question, I arrived early and scouted for the best location to create my VAST photo. I then got to work setting up the special equipment needed and photographing the entire scene without a train. Once completed, I prepared for the train’s arrival. The train passes over the viaduct each morning at around 10:40 am. I would have just one chance to capture the train in a way that it could be seamlessly incorporated into the hundreds and hundreds of other photos I had already taken to create one ultra-high-resolution photo. If it did not work out, I would have a lovely ultra-high-resolution photo of an empty viaduct. But as the results show, my quest was successful.

As a side note, readers may wonder why there are not two opportunities to capture the train each day on the viaduct as runs a daily return service. Well, there are in fact two opportunities but only one that makes for a good photo. The issue is the lack of a turnaround in Mallaig. As a result, the engine and tender are backward on the return trip with the front of the engine attached to the passenger cars and the tender out front. The train drives in reverse for the entire journey and it just looks odd.

Explore this photo

Is this a photo of the Hogwarts Express? And is Harry Potter on board? The answer is no, but it certainly was the Harry Potter movies that made these steam trains and this viaduct famous. The Jacobite Steam Trains have in fact been running between Fort William and Mallaig and crossing Glenfinnan Viaduct since 1984. Located in the Scottish West Highlands, the Glenfinnan Viaduct was completed in 1898 and was built from concrete with 21 semicircular spans of 50 feet along its 416 yards.

On my recent trip to Scotland, I identified several locations at which I wanted to try and create an ultra-high-resolution VAST photo. With the well-known Scottish weather, “try” was all I could hope for. It would not be possible to stay at each location for a week waiting for perfect weather, so I knew I would have to work within the conditions at any given location on any given day.

One such location on my list was the famous Jacobite Steam Train crossing the equally famous Glenfinnan Viaduct. Since the Harry Potter movies, the site has become a popular tourist stop and has been photographed endlessly but what I have never seen was an ultra-high-resolution image with a train on the viaduct. So that was my quest. A “regular” photo or “regular” panoramic would not do. But unlike a static mountain or meadow, where the digital camera is repositioned across the scene with overlapping photos taken at each position and then later stitched together, this scene would present a new challenge with a train racing through it. The train needed to be captured in its entirety with its motion frozen. Shooting the entire scene in a single exposure on film was one option but I did not plan on hauling my large panoramic film camera to Scotland and even then, it would not capture the scene with the ultra-high-resolution I was looking for. So, in the weeks before my trip began, I formulated a plan on how I hoped to pull off the inclusion of the speeding train. On the day in question, I arrived early and scouted for the best location to create my VAST photo. I then got to work setting up the special equipment needed and photographing the entire scene without a train. Once completed, I prepared for the train’s arrival. The train passes over the viaduct each morning at around 10:40 am. I would have just one chance to capture the train in a way that it could be seamlessly incorporated into the hundreds and hundreds of other photos I had already taken to create one ultra-high-resolution photo. If it did not work out, I would have a lovely ultra-high-resolution photo of an empty viaduct. But as the results show, my quest was successful.

As a side note, readers may wonder why there are not two opportunities to capture the train each day on the viaduct as runs a daily return service. Well, there are in fact two opportunities but only one that makes for a good photo. The issue is the lack of a turnaround in Mallaig. As a result, the engine and tender are backward on the return trip with the front of the engine attached to the passenger cars and the tender out front. The train drives in reverse for the entire journey and it just looks odd.

Explore this photo

2,691 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of the Jacobite railroad train steam locomotive going across the Glenfinnan Viaduct bridge; landscape wall mural photograph created by Scott Dimond in Glenfinnan Viaduct, United Kingdom

The Jacobite 44871 on the Glenfinnan Viaduct: Wide

2,691 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Glenfinnan Viaduct, United Kingdom

Is this a photo of the Hogwarts Express? And is Harry Potter on board? The answer is no, but it certainly was the Harry Potter movies that made these steam trains and this viaduct famous. The Jacobite Steam Trains have in fact been running between Fort William and Mallaig and crossing Glenfinnan Viaduct since 1984. Located in the Scottish West Highlands, the Glenfinnan Viaduct was completed in 1898 and was built from concrete with 21 semicircular spans of 50 feet along its 416 yards.

On my recent trip to Scotland, I identified several locations at which I wanted to try and create an ultra-high-resolution VAST photo. With the well-known Scottish weather, “try” was all I could hope for. It would not be possible to stay at each location for a week waiting for perfect weather, so I knew I would have to work within the conditions at any given location on any given day.

One such location on my list was the famous Jacobite Steam Train crossing the equally famous Glenfinnan Viaduct. Since the Harry Potter movies, the site has become a popular tourist stop and has been photographed endlessly but what I have never seen was an ultra-high-resolution image with a train on the viaduct. So that was my quest. A “regular” photo or “regular” panoramic would not do. But unlike a static mountain or meadow, where the digital camera is repositioned across the scene with overlapping photos taken at each position and then later stitched together, this scene would present a new challenge with a train racing through it. The train needed to be captured in its entirety with its motion frozen. Shooting the entire scene in a single exposure on film was one option but I did not plan on hauling my large panoramic film camera to Scotland and even then, it would not capture the scene with the ultra-high-resolution I was looking for. So, in the weeks before my trip began, I formulated a plan on how I hoped to pull off the inclusion of the speeding train. On the day in question, I arrived early and scouted for the best location to create my VAST photo. I then got to work setting up the special equipment needed and photographing the entire scene without a train. Once completed, I prepared for the train’s arrival. The train passes over the viaduct each morning at around 10:40 am. I would have just one chance to capture the train in a way that it could be seamlessly incorporated into the hundreds and hundreds of other photos I had already taken to create one ultra-high-resolution photo. If it did not work out, I would have a lovely ultra-high-resolution photo of an empty viaduct. But as the results show, my quest was successful.

As a side note, readers may wonder why there are not two opportunities to capture the train each day on the viaduct as runs a daily return service. Well, there are in fact two opportunities but only one that makes for a good photo. The issue is the lack of a turnaround in Mallaig. As a result, the engine and tender are backward on the return trip with the front of the engine attached to the passenger cars and the tender out front. The train drives in reverse for the entire journey and it just looks odd.

Explore this photo

Is this a photo of the Hogwarts Express? And is Harry Potter on board? The answer is no, but it certainly was the Harry Potter movies that made these steam trains and this viaduct famous. The Jacobite Steam Trains have in fact been running between Fort William and Mallaig and crossing Glenfinnan Viaduct since 1984. Located in the Scottish West Highlands, the Glenfinnan Viaduct was completed in 1898 and was built from concrete with 21 semicircular spans of 50 feet along its 416 yards.

On my recent trip to Scotland, I identified several locations at which I wanted to try and create an ultra-high-resolution VAST photo. With the well-known Scottish weather, “try” was all I could hope for. It would not be possible to stay at each location for a week waiting for perfect weather, so I knew I would have to work within the conditions at any given location on any given day.

One such location on my list was the famous Jacobite Steam Train crossing the equally famous Glenfinnan Viaduct. Since the Harry Potter movies, the site has become a popular tourist stop and has been photographed endlessly but what I have never seen was an ultra-high-resolution image with a train on the viaduct. So that was my quest. A “regular” photo or “regular” panoramic would not do. But unlike a static mountain or meadow, where the digital camera is repositioned across the scene with overlapping photos taken at each position and then later stitched together, this scene would present a new challenge with a train racing through it. The train needed to be captured in its entirety with its motion frozen. Shooting the entire scene in a single exposure on film was one option but I did not plan on hauling my large panoramic film camera to Scotland and even then, it would not capture the scene with the ultra-high-resolution I was looking for. So, in the weeks before my trip began, I formulated a plan on how I hoped to pull off the inclusion of the speeding train. On the day in question, I arrived early and scouted for the best location to create my VAST photo. I then got to work setting up the special equipment needed and photographing the entire scene without a train. Once completed, I prepared for the train’s arrival. The train passes over the viaduct each morning at around 10:40 am. I would have just one chance to capture the train in a way that it could be seamlessly incorporated into the hundreds and hundreds of other photos I had already taken to create one ultra-high-resolution photo. If it did not work out, I would have a lovely ultra-high-resolution photo of an empty viaduct. But as the results show, my quest was successful.

As a side note, readers may wonder why there are not two opportunities to capture the train each day on the viaduct as runs a daily return service. Well, there are in fact two opportunities but only one that makes for a good photo. The issue is the lack of a turnaround in Mallaig. As a result, the engine and tender are backward on the return trip with the front of the engine attached to the passenger cars and the tender out front. The train drives in reverse for the entire journey and it just looks odd.

Explore this photo

1,531 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of the Jacobite railroad train steam locomotive going across the Glenfinnan Viaduct bridge; photograph created by Scott Dimond in Glenfinnan Viaduct, United Kingdom

The Jacobite 44871 on the Glenfinnan Viaduct

1,531 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Glenfinnan Viaduct, United Kingdom

Is this a photo of the Hogwarts Express? And is Harry Potter on board? The answer is no, but it certainly was the Harry Potter movies that made these steam trains and this viaduct famous. The Jacobite Steam Trains have in fact been running between Fort William and Mallaig and crossing Glenfinnan Viaduct since 1984. Located in the Scottish West Highlands, the Glenfinnan Viaduct was completed in 1898 and was built from concrete with 21 semicircular spans of 50 feet along its 416 yards.

On my recent trip to Scotland, I identified several locations at which I wanted to try and create an ultra-high-resolution VAST photo. With the well-known Scottish weather, “try” was all I could hope for. It would not be possible to stay at each location for a week waiting for perfect weather, so I knew I would have to work within the conditions at any given location on any given day.

One such location on my list was the famous Jacobite Steam Train crossing the equally famous Glenfinnan Viaduct. Since the Harry Potter movies, the site has become a popular tourist stop and has been photographed endlessly but what I have never seen was an ultra-high-resolution image with a train on the viaduct. So that was my quest. A “regular” photo or “regular” panoramic would not do. But unlike a static mountain or meadow, where the digital camera is repositioned across the scene with overlapping photos taken at each position and then later stitched together, this scene would present a new challenge with a train racing through it. The train needed to be captured in its entirety with its motion frozen. Shooting the entire scene in a single exposure on film was one option but I did not plan on hauling my large panoramic film camera to Scotland and even then, it would not capture the scene with the ultra-high-resolution I was looking for. So, in the weeks before my trip began, I formulated a plan on how I hoped to pull off the inclusion of the speeding train. On the day in question, I arrived early and scouted for the best location to create my VAST photo. I then got to work setting up the special equipment needed and photographing the entire scene without a train. Once completed, I prepared for the train’s arrival. The train passes over the viaduct each morning at around 10:40 am. I would have just one chance to capture the train in a way that it could be seamlessly incorporated into the hundreds and hundreds of other photos I had already taken to create one ultra-high-resolution photo. If it did not work out, I would have a lovely ultra-high-resolution photo of an empty viaduct. But as the results show, my quest was successful.

As a side note, readers may wonder why there are not two opportunities to capture the train each day on the viaduct as runs a daily return service. Well, there are in fact two opportunities but only one that makes for a good photo. The issue is the lack of a turnaround in Mallaig. As a result, the engine and tender are backward on the return trip with the front of the engine attached to the passenger cars and the tender out front. The train drives in reverse for the entire journey and it just looks odd.

Explore this photo

Is this a photo of the Hogwarts Express? And is Harry Potter on board? The answer is no, but it certainly was the Harry Potter movies that made these steam trains and this viaduct famous. The Jacobite Steam Trains have in fact been running between Fort William and Mallaig and crossing Glenfinnan Viaduct since 1984. Located in the Scottish West Highlands, the Glenfinnan Viaduct was completed in 1898 and was built from concrete with 21 semicircular spans of 50 feet along its 416 yards.

On my recent trip to Scotland, I identified several locations at which I wanted to try and create an ultra-high-resolution VAST photo. With the well-known Scottish weather, “try” was all I could hope for. It would not be possible to stay at each location for a week waiting for perfect weather, so I knew I would have to work within the conditions at any given location on any given day.

One such location on my list was the famous Jacobite Steam Train crossing the equally famous Glenfinnan Viaduct. Since the Harry Potter movies, the site has become a popular tourist stop and has been photographed endlessly but what I have never seen was an ultra-high-resolution image with a train on the viaduct. So that was my quest. A “regular” photo or “regular” panoramic would not do. But unlike a static mountain or meadow, where the digital camera is repositioned across the scene with overlapping photos taken at each position and then later stitched together, this scene would present a new challenge with a train racing through it. The train needed to be captured in its entirety with its motion frozen. Shooting the entire scene in a single exposure on film was one option but I did not plan on hauling my large panoramic film camera to Scotland and even then, it would not capture the scene with the ultra-high-resolution I was looking for. So, in the weeks before my trip began, I formulated a plan on how I hoped to pull off the inclusion of the speeding train. On the day in question, I arrived early and scouted for the best location to create my VAST photo. I then got to work setting up the special equipment needed and photographing the entire scene without a train. Once completed, I prepared for the train’s arrival. The train passes over the viaduct each morning at around 10:40 am. I would have just one chance to capture the train in a way that it could be seamlessly incorporated into the hundreds and hundreds of other photos I had already taken to create one ultra-high-resolution photo. If it did not work out, I would have a lovely ultra-high-resolution photo of an empty viaduct. But as the results show, my quest was successful.

As a side note, readers may wonder why there are not two opportunities to capture the train each day on the viaduct as runs a daily return service. Well, there are in fact two opportunities but only one that makes for a good photo. The issue is the lack of a turnaround in Mallaig. As a result, the engine and tender are backward on the return trip with the front of the engine attached to the passenger cars and the tender out front. The train drives in reverse for the entire journey and it just looks odd.

Explore this photo

903 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of a brown landscape with autumn trees and mountains; photograph created by Duilio Fiorille in L

Autumn in the Vallée de la Clarée

903 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
L'Arisan, Névache, France

This VAST photo is very recent, I created it just a few days ago (October 2022).

The intent was to introduce VAST Customers to this wonderful place, one of the most beautiful valleys in the French Alps, where the autumn folilage takes on truly incredible and intense colors.

The point that I have taken allows you to see a large part of the valley, enjoying the details of the larches in autumn, as well as the beautiful rock formations and peaks that overlook the entire valley.

The Vallée de la Clarée is a scenic valley in the French Alps near to Montgenèvre, Briançon and the French-Italian border. The Clarée river runs through the valley.

The mountains on either side are part of the Massif des Cerces. To the west they are between 2800 and 2900m high, while on the east side they are between 2300 and 2400m high. Consequently, the snow is slow to melt and gives rise to the name of the central commune Névache meaning "snowed".

The valley lies at between 1400 and 2000m and contains meadows and larch forest. This alpine situation creates great biological diversity with several different habitats such as flooded soils and peat. These valleys contain 39% of known plant species in the French Alps, and 61% of those in the arrondissement of Briançon.

The Vallée de la Clarée and the adjoining Vallée Etroite cover 26,000 hectares and contain famous hiking trails (GR 57, Tour du Mont Thabor, Grande Traversée des Alpes). The valleys are exceptional area in that they have been preserved in their natural state. Agriculture, forestry and the rearing of livestock are still carried out traditionally.

Consequently, the valley is one of the most visited parts of the Hautes-Alpes department. Visitors have been estimated at 600,000 visits per year. As a result, and as a result of the campaign led by Émilie Carles, the valleys have been given the status of protected areas since 1992. In the summer the valley is visited by cyclists and walkers and by riders who use the large stables in Les Alberts.

The river is used for water sports especially in spring as the snow melts. There are sections of white water, which are used by kayaks and white water rafts. There is a dramatic waterfall at Fontcouverte.

The valley in winter is covered in snow, which is enjoyed by many cross-country skiers. There are over 65 km of trails. It has one of the main circuits where the French cross-country team train. Although it is popular for cross-country ski-ing, the valley's protected status has prevented ski-lifts being installed.

The valley is famous for its numerous sun-dials.

Explore this photo

This VAST photo is very recent, I created it just a few days ago (October 2022).

The intent was to introduce VAST Customers to this wonderful place, one of the most beautiful valleys in the French Alps, where the autumn folilage takes on truly incredible and intense colors.

The point that I have taken allows you to see a large part of the valley, enjoying the details of the larches in autumn, as well as the beautiful rock formations and peaks that overlook the entire valley.

The Vallée de la Clarée is a scenic valley in the French Alps near to Montgenèvre, Briançon and the French-Italian border. The Clarée river runs through the valley.

The mountains on either side are part of the Massif des Cerces. To the west they are between 2800 and 2900m high, while on the east side they are between 2300 and 2400m high. Consequently, the snow is slow to melt and gives rise to the name of the central commune Névache meaning "snowed".

The valley lies at between 1400 and 2000m and contains meadows and larch forest. This alpine situation creates great biological diversity with several different habitats such as flooded soils and peat. These valleys contain 39% of known plant species in the French Alps, and 61% of those in the arrondissement of Briançon.

The Vallée de la Clarée and the adjoining Vallée Etroite cover 26,000 hectares and contain famous hiking trails (GR 57, Tour du Mont Thabor, Grande Traversée des Alpes). The valleys are exceptional area in that they have been preserved in their natural state. Agriculture, forestry and the rearing of livestock are still carried out traditionally.

Consequently, the valley is one of the most visited parts of the Hautes-Alpes department. Visitors have been estimated at 600,000 visits per year. As a result, and as a result of the campaign led by Émilie Carles, the valleys have been given the status of protected areas since 1992. In the summer the valley is visited by cyclists and walkers and by riders who use the large stables in Les Alberts.

The river is used for water sports especially in spring as the snow melts. There are sections of white water, which are used by kayaks and white water rafts. There is a dramatic waterfall at Fontcouverte.

The valley in winter is covered in snow, which is enjoyed by many cross-country skiers. There are over 65 km of trails. It has one of the main circuits where the French cross-country team train. Although it is popular for cross-country ski-ing, the valley's protected status has prevented ski-lifts being installed.

The valley is famous for its numerous sun-dials.

Explore this photo

276 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of a dramatic sunset at the Grand Canyon; photograph created by David David at Yavapai Point in Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona.

CHERISH THE MOMENT

276 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Yavapai Point, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona

The Grand Canyon is well … the Grand Canyon. It is incredible and incredibly diverse. If you happen to visit the touristy South Rim, spend a few minutes gazing over the rim, then leave and think that you’ve seen the Grand Canyon, you’re mistaken. You haven’t.

I suggest, even if you just stay at the South rim, stay for a while, because every day the canyon can look different and every evening there’s potential for an incredible sunset. This Ultra High-Resolution Image captures visitors along the South Rim Trail at Yavapai Point experiencing an incredible Grand Canyon sunset.

To get even a better feel for the canyon, but staying on rim level, visit the East rim, and the beautiful North Rim, making sure to stop at all the viewpoints you encounter.

To appreciate the canyon a bit more, take a hike down one of its easier trails for a bit. Bright Angel Trail on the South Rim or North Kaibab Trail on The North Rim are good options. Pay attention to the warning signs and remember to know your limits.

Remember, the canyon is a reverse mountain. The easy part, the going down, is first. The hard part, the going up, comes second and usually after you’re already tired and run out of water! And a helicopter rescue is rather pricy.

To appreciate the canyon even more, spend a few nights hiking and camping below the rim, or go to the bottom and stay at Bright Angel Campground or Phantom Ranch, or even knock off that bucket list item of a multi-day rim-to-rim backpack trip.

To really, really appreciate the canyon head into something like Zone BE9 or AF9 and spend a week or so backpacking. Only make sure you’re in great shape and an experienced survivalist first.

I’ve done all of the aforementioned, and while I’m saying you can’t truly experience the Grand Canyon with just a brief stop at the South Rim, I also need to toss in a word of caution. Don’t do anything stupid. I’ve spent a lot of time in and around the canyon and I’ve never been on a multi-day backpack without witnessing someone needing to be rescued.

So, if you really, really, really want to experience the Grand Canyon simply purchase this VAST Ultra High-Resolution Image for your home or office. No helicopter necessary!

Title Origin: As mentioned, over the years I’ve been all around the Grand Canyon. But on a recent visit I realized that I had never walked the easy, paved (mostly) South Rim Trail that stretches approximately from the South Kaibab Trailhead to Hermits Rest. The fact that it’s easy and paved is probably why I never had. Well, I’m glad I did it, and while doing so took the opportunity to capture this Ultra High-Resolution Image of visitors who were able to “Cherish The Moment” of their unforgettable trip to the Grand Canyon.

Thanks ... and thanks again,

David David

Life Is An Adventure!

Explore this photo

The Grand Canyon is well … the Grand Canyon. It is incredible and incredibly diverse. If you happen to visit the touristy South Rim, spend a few minutes gazing over the rim, then leave and think that you’ve seen the Grand Canyon, you’re mistaken. You haven’t.

I suggest, even if you just stay at the South rim, stay for a while, because every day the canyon can look different and every evening there’s potential for an incredible sunset. This Ultra High-Resolution Image captures visitors along the South Rim Trail at Yavapai Point experiencing an incredible Grand Canyon sunset.

To get even a better feel for the canyon, but staying on rim level, visit the East rim, and the beautiful North Rim, making sure to stop at all the viewpoints you encounter.

To appreciate the canyon a bit more, take a hike down one of its easier trails for a bit. Bright Angel Trail on the South Rim or North Kaibab Trail on The North Rim are good options. Pay attention to the warning signs and remember to know your limits.

Remember, the canyon is a reverse mountain. The easy part, the going down, is first. The hard part, the going up, comes second and usually after you’re already tired and run out of water! And a helicopter rescue is rather pricy.

To appreciate the canyon even more, spend a few nights hiking and camping below the rim, or go to the bottom and stay at Bright Angel Campground or Phantom Ranch, or even knock off that bucket list item of a multi-day rim-to-rim backpack trip.

To really, really appreciate the canyon head into something like Zone BE9 or AF9 and spend a week or so backpacking. Only make sure you’re in great shape and an experienced survivalist first.

I’ve done all of the aforementioned, and while I’m saying you can’t truly experience the Grand Canyon with just a brief stop at the South Rim, I also need to toss in a word of caution. Don’t do anything stupid. I’ve spent a lot of time in and around the canyon and I’ve never been on a multi-day backpack without witnessing someone needing to be rescued.

So, if you really, really, really want to experience the Grand Canyon simply purchase this VAST Ultra High-Resolution Image for your home or office. No helicopter necessary!

Title Origin: As mentioned, over the years I’ve been all around the Grand Canyon. But on a recent visit I realized that I had never walked the easy, paved (mostly) South Rim Trail that stretches approximately from the South Kaibab Trailhead to Hermits Rest. The fact that it’s easy and paved is probably why I never had. Well, I’m glad I did it, and while doing so took the opportunity to capture this Ultra High-Resolution Image of visitors who were able to “Cherish The Moment” of their unforgettable trip to the Grand Canyon.

Thanks ... and thanks again,

David David

Life Is An Adventure!

Explore this photo

276 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of rock formations at Park Avenue in Arches National Park at sunset; landscape photograph created by David David at Park Avenue in Arches National Park, Utah.

PARK AVENUE SATURATED

276 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Park Avenue, Arches National Park, Utah

There are sunsets, and then there are sunsets.

I’ve witnessed a myriad of incredible sunsets in my life, with “witnessed” being the operative word here. Most of the countless numbers of incredible, amazing, gorgeous sunsets I’ve seen have been just that, I saw or witnessed them. But a tiny few were more than just “witnessed” and fall into an entirely different category. These sunsets were very different. They are also hard to explain unless you’ve experienced it for yourself. The best I can say is that you feel a part of the sunset, not just a witness. Saturated, if you will, in the color of the sunset. “Park Avenue Saturated” was one such sunset.

It’s almost an eerie feeling. It would be as if you were wearing, in the case of “Park Avenue Saturated” pink or blush tinted glasses and everything you saw was colored that way. I’ve experienced this phenomenon also in the Arizona desert and on the shores of Northern Lake Michigan.

With regards to the Lake Michigan sunset, everything was as if I was looking through glasses that were tinted turquoise. Everything was dripping turquoise. Maybe another way to explain it is that I felt as if I was wrapped in a turquoise blanket. It was more than just viewing a turquoise sunset; it was being a participant in a turquoise sunset. These tiny few sunsets were an all-consuming, drenching, otherworldly experience.

This VAST Ultra High-Resolution Image tells of that saturation.

Title Origin: Upon entering Arches National Park the first major stop is the Park Avenue and Courthouse Towers viewpoint. This image was produced in that general area. The title “Park Avenue Saturated” reflects the unbelievable saturation of color that took place not only in the sky, but on everything the light touched. This was one of those instances as a photographer where it was difficult to stay focused on the task at hand. I simply wanted to stand there and take it all in.

While words can’t describe what it’s like witnessing a sunset of this nature, this VAST Ultra High-Resolution Image replicates the experience quite well.

I invite you to immerse and saturate yourself!

Thanks ... and thanks again,

David David

Life Is An Adventure!

Explore this photo

There are sunsets, and then there are sunsets.

I’ve witnessed a myriad of incredible sunsets in my life, with “witnessed” being the operative word here. Most of the countless numbers of incredible, amazing, gorgeous sunsets I’ve seen have been just that, I saw or witnessed them. But a tiny few were more than just “witnessed” and fall into an entirely different category. These sunsets were very different. They are also hard to explain unless you’ve experienced it for yourself. The best I can say is that you feel a part of the sunset, not just a witness. Saturated, if you will, in the color of the sunset. “Park Avenue Saturated” was one such sunset.

It’s almost an eerie feeling. It would be as if you were wearing, in the case of “Park Avenue Saturated” pink or blush tinted glasses and everything you saw was colored that way. I’ve experienced this phenomenon also in the Arizona desert and on the shores of Northern Lake Michigan.

With regards to the Lake Michigan sunset, everything was as if I was looking through glasses that were tinted turquoise. Everything was dripping turquoise. Maybe another way to explain it is that I felt as if I was wrapped in a turquoise blanket. It was more than just viewing a turquoise sunset; it was being a participant in a turquoise sunset. These tiny few sunsets were an all-consuming, drenching, otherworldly experience.

This VAST Ultra High-Resolution Image tells of that saturation.

Title Origin: Upon entering Arches National Park the first major stop is the Park Avenue and Courthouse Towers viewpoint. This image was produced in that general area. The title “Park Avenue Saturated” reflects the unbelievable saturation of color that took place not only in the sky, but on everything the light touched. This was one of those instances as a photographer where it was difficult to stay focused on the task at hand. I simply wanted to stand there and take it all in.

While words can’t describe what it’s like witnessing a sunset of this nature, this VAST Ultra High-Resolution Image replicates the experience quite well.

I invite you to immerse and saturate yourself!

Thanks ... and thanks again,

David David

Life Is An Adventure!

Explore this photo

2,018 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of an autumn morning at a lake with a perfect reflection of mountains and a blue sky; landscape photograph created by Scott Dimond in Wedge Pond, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada

Autumn morning at Wedge Pond

2,018 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Wedge Pond, Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada

218 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of Sanssouci Park in autumn; photograph created by Scott Dimond in Schlosspark Sanssouci, Potsdam, Germany.

Autumn at Sanssouci: Cropped

218 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Schlosspark Sanssouci, Potsdam, Germany

Sanssouci is a historical palace and park in Potsdam, near Berlin, Germany. Built by Prussian King Frederick the Great as his summer palace, it is often thought of as the German rival to Versailles. Besides the main palace, Schloss Sanssouci, the area contains many other palaces. One such palace, the Orangery Palace, is separated from the Belvedere Klausberg by a long tree-lined promenade. It was here, on a fine October day, that I found myself standing and admiring two 500-meter (550-yard) long rows of trees, their bright yellow leaves glowing in the sunshine with the Belvedere Klausberg standing tall between them in the distance. It was also here that I decided to unpack my photo gear and create a wonderful VAST image of the scene.

Explore this photo

Sanssouci is a historical palace and park in Potsdam, near Berlin, Germany. Built by Prussian King Frederick the Great as his summer palace, it is often thought of as the German rival to Versailles. Besides the main palace, Schloss Sanssouci, the area contains many other palaces. One such palace, the Orangery Palace, is separated from the Belvedere Klausberg by a long tree-lined promenade. It was here, on a fine October day, that I found myself standing and admiring two 500-meter (550-yard) long rows of trees, their bright yellow leaves glowing in the sunshine with the Belvedere Klausberg standing tall between them in the distance. It was also here that I decided to unpack my photo gear and create a wonderful VAST image of the scene.

Explore this photo

398 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of autumn trees lining a grassy strip; wall mural photograph created by Scott Dimond in Schlosspark Sanssouci, Potsdam, Germany.

Autumn at Sanssouci

398 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Schlosspark Sanssouci, Potsdam, Germany

Sanssouci is a historical palace and park in Potsdam, near Berlin, Germany. Built by Prussian King Frederick the Great as his summer palace, it is often thought of as the German rival to Versailles. Besides the main palace, Schloss Sanssouci, the area contains many other palaces. One such palace, the Orangery Palace, is separated from the Belvedere Klausberg by a long tree-lined promenade. It was here, on a fine October day, that I found myself standing and admiring two 500-meter (550-yard) long rows of trees, their bright yellow leaves glowing in the sunshine with the Belvedere Klausberg standing tall between them in the distance. It was also here that I decided to unpack my photo gear and create a wonderful VAST image of the scene.

Explore this photo

Sanssouci is a historical palace and park in Potsdam, near Berlin, Germany. Built by Prussian King Frederick the Great as his summer palace, it is often thought of as the German rival to Versailles. Besides the main palace, Schloss Sanssouci, the area contains many other palaces. One such palace, the Orangery Palace, is separated from the Belvedere Klausberg by a long tree-lined promenade. It was here, on a fine October day, that I found myself standing and admiring two 500-meter (550-yard) long rows of trees, their bright yellow leaves glowing in the sunshine with the Belvedere Klausberg standing tall between them in the distance. It was also here that I decided to unpack my photo gear and create a wonderful VAST image of the scene.

Explore this photo

235 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of aspen trees in autumn; vertical aspect ratio photograph created by Francesco Emanuele Carucci in Silver Lake, California

Golden Trees II: Cropped

235 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Silver Lake, California

Golden Trees #2, June Lake, Mono County, USA.

"Everything you love is likely to be lost, but in the end, love will return in a different way."

Explore this photo

Golden Trees #2, June Lake, Mono County, USA.

"Everything you love is likely to be lost, but in the end, love will return in a different way."

Explore this photo

196 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of a group of horses standing in a desert; fine art photograph created by David David in Dugway Valley, Utah

OUTCASTS: CROPPED B&W

196 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Dugway Valley, Utah

Having owned horses, and ever since acquiring an expertise in the photographic discipline of Ultra High-Resolution Imagery, I’ve wanted to try my hand at photographing them in this manner. So inevitably, I found myself doing just that.

I had spent about four days searching for the Onaqui Wild Mustang Herd in the middle of nowhere Utah. While pursuing the main herd, I occasionally came across lone horses or very small groups such as the one depicted in “Outcasts”. Talking with a BLM ranger associated with managing the herd he explained that for one reason or another, typically some sort of “defect”, horses are sometimes kicked out of the main herd. Cast out, if you will.

On the fourth day I gave up on ever finding the main herd and started out of the area. But I’d stop periodically to look, just in case, scanning the surroundings with my big camera lens. During one stop I located a few horses about a mile away. My initial thought was that this was just another group of outcasts. But my second thought was, “I wonder what is just beyond those horses on the other side of that ridge?” Curiosity always wins out and off I went! As I crested the ridge, I was greeted by the entire Onaqui Wild Mustang Herd, about three hundred horses. I had found them. They were healthy and beautiful. Quite a contrast to the outcasts.

Although I photographed the main herd for about an hour, I ended up enjoying my time with the outcasts more and ultimately also the photos. There was something about the outcasts that drew me to them.

I’ve always been that way, drawn to the “outcast” that is. This probably partially explains why I founded the non-profit Outdoors for Everyone Project. Because everyone, whatever the reason for not being able to physically get to the outdoors, should still be able to reap its benefits.

Title Origin: The title “Outcasts” was the obvious choice.

Thanks ... and thanks again,

David David

Life Is An Adventure!

Explore this photo

Having owned horses, and ever since acquiring an expertise in the photographic discipline of Ultra High-Resolution Imagery, I’ve wanted to try my hand at photographing them in this manner. So inevitably, I found myself doing just that.

I had spent about four days searching for the Onaqui Wild Mustang Herd in the middle of nowhere Utah. While pursuing the main herd, I occasionally came across lone horses or very small groups such as the one depicted in “Outcasts”. Talking with a BLM ranger associated with managing the herd he explained that for one reason or another, typically some sort of “defect”, horses are sometimes kicked out of the main herd. Cast out, if you will.

On the fourth day I gave up on ever finding the main herd and started out of the area. But I’d stop periodically to look, just in case, scanning the surroundings with my big camera lens. During one stop I located a few horses about a mile away. My initial thought was that this was just another group of outcasts. But my second thought was, “I wonder what is just beyond those horses on the other side of that ridge?” Curiosity always wins out and off I went! As I crested the ridge, I was greeted by the entire Onaqui Wild Mustang Herd, about three hundred horses. I had found them. They were healthy and beautiful. Quite a contrast to the outcasts.

Although I photographed the main herd for about an hour, I ended up enjoying my time with the outcasts more and ultimately also the photos. There was something about the outcasts that drew me to them.

I’ve always been that way, drawn to the “outcast” that is. This probably partially explains why I founded the non-profit Outdoors for Everyone Project. Because everyone, whatever the reason for not being able to physically get to the outdoors, should still be able to reap its benefits.

Title Origin: The title “Outcasts” was the obvious choice.

Thanks ... and thanks again,

David David

Life Is An Adventure!

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