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294 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of the view from the Empire State Building; black & white photograph created by Tim Lo Monaco at the Empire State Building in Manhattan, New York City, New York

Above Manhattan B&W: Cropped

294 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Empire State Building, Manhattan, New York City, New York

New York City is one of those cities where one must visit in order to grasp the size, density and vibrance. It puts things into perspective of how small we are on this earth. The city is alive and constantly changing. I think most New Yorkers would be able to spot tourists like myself from a mile away. I walked the streets staring upwards, in constant awe of the sheer size of the buildings.

Millions of people call this incredible city home. I never tire of exploring the streets and sites hidden in plain view in my own 7 ft wide print hanging in my home. Just as impressive as the view is the Empire State Building itself. Nearly 100 years old, the behemoth still stands taller than most buildings in Manhattan and is beautiful in its own right. At over 1200 feet tall, it permits us mere humans a birds-eye view of the world below. A chance to glimpse a moment in time of the ever-changing city and its occupants.

I took this photo on an early fall morning from the 86th floor observation deck of the Empire State Building. That was an experience in itself. I grew up across the river from Washington, D.C. where no building can be taller than the U.S. Capitol Building. Standing atop the Empire State Building, it’s impossible not to be overwhelmed by the grandeur of the bustling city. I knew I wanted to capture the entire view with the skyscrapers as far as I could see. Using my mid-range telephoto lens, I shot 28 photos (two rows of 14). Each input image was a blend of three exposures so I could pick up some detail in the deep shadows cast by the skyscrapers. Above Manhattan, I grew an appreciation for the millions of things happening at once that make up one of the largest and most vibrant cities in the world.

Explore this photo

New York City is one of those cities where one must visit in order to grasp the size, density and vibrance. It puts things into perspective of how small we are on this earth. The city is alive and constantly changing. I think most New Yorkers would be able to spot tourists like myself from a mile away. I walked the streets staring upwards, in constant awe of the sheer size of the buildings.

Millions of people call this incredible city home. I never tire of exploring the streets and sites hidden in plain view in my own 7 ft wide print hanging in my home. Just as impressive as the view is the Empire State Building itself. Nearly 100 years old, the behemoth still stands taller than most buildings in Manhattan and is beautiful in its own right. At over 1200 feet tall, it permits us mere humans a birds-eye view of the world below. A chance to glimpse a moment in time of the ever-changing city and its occupants.

I took this photo on an early fall morning from the 86th floor observation deck of the Empire State Building. That was an experience in itself. I grew up across the river from Washington, D.C. where no building can be taller than the U.S. Capitol Building. Standing atop the Empire State Building, it’s impossible not to be overwhelmed by the grandeur of the bustling city. I knew I wanted to capture the entire view with the skyscrapers as far as I could see. Using my mid-range telephoto lens, I shot 28 photos (two rows of 14). Each input image was a blend of three exposures so I could pick up some detail in the deep shadows cast by the skyscrapers. Above Manhattan, I grew an appreciation for the millions of things happening at once that make up one of the largest and most vibrant cities in the world.

Explore this photo

416 megapixels! A very high resolution, black & white aerial photo of New York City; cityscape photograph created by Tim Lo Monaco at the Empire State Building in Manhattan, New York City, New York

Above Manhattan B&W

416 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Empire State Building, Manhattan, New York City, New York

New York City is one of those cities where one must visit in order to grasp the size, density and vibrance. It puts things into perspective of how small we are on this earth. The city is alive and constantly changing. I think most New Yorkers would be able to spot tourists like myself from a mile away. I walked the streets staring upwards, in constant awe of the sheer size of the buildings.

Millions of people call this incredible city home. I never tire of exploring the streets and sites hidden in plain view in my own 7 ft wide print hanging in my home. Just as impressive as the view is the Empire State Building itself. Nearly 100 years old, the behemoth still stands taller than most buildings in Manhattan and is beautiful in its own right. At over 1200 feet tall, it permits us mere humans a birds-eye view of the world below. A chance to glimpse a moment in time of the ever-changing city and its occupants.

I took this photo on an early fall morning from the 86th floor observation deck of the Empire State Building. That was an experience in itself. I grew up across the river from Washington, D.C. where no building can be taller than the U.S. Capitol Building. Standing atop the Empire State Building, it’s impossible not to be overwhelmed by the grandeur of the bustling city. I knew I wanted to capture the entire view with the skyscrapers as far as I could see. Using my mid-range telephoto lens, I shot 28 photos (two rows of 14). Each input image was a blend of three exposures so I could pick up some detail in the deep shadows cast by the skyscrapers. Above Manhattan, I grew an appreciation for the millions of things happening at once that make up one of the largest and most vibrant cities in the world.

Explore this photo

New York City is one of those cities where one must visit in order to grasp the size, density and vibrance. It puts things into perspective of how small we are on this earth. The city is alive and constantly changing. I think most New Yorkers would be able to spot tourists like myself from a mile away. I walked the streets staring upwards, in constant awe of the sheer size of the buildings.

Millions of people call this incredible city home. I never tire of exploring the streets and sites hidden in plain view in my own 7 ft wide print hanging in my home. Just as impressive as the view is the Empire State Building itself. Nearly 100 years old, the behemoth still stands taller than most buildings in Manhattan and is beautiful in its own right. At over 1200 feet tall, it permits us mere humans a birds-eye view of the world below. A chance to glimpse a moment in time of the ever-changing city and its occupants.

I took this photo on an early fall morning from the 86th floor observation deck of the Empire State Building. That was an experience in itself. I grew up across the river from Washington, D.C. where no building can be taller than the U.S. Capitol Building. Standing atop the Empire State Building, it’s impossible not to be overwhelmed by the grandeur of the bustling city. I knew I wanted to capture the entire view with the skyscrapers as far as I could see. Using my mid-range telephoto lens, I shot 28 photos (two rows of 14). Each input image was a blend of three exposures so I could pick up some detail in the deep shadows cast by the skyscrapers. Above Manhattan, I grew an appreciation for the millions of things happening at once that make up one of the largest and most vibrant cities in the world.

Explore this photo

294 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of the view from the Empire State Building; aerial cityscape photograph created by Tim Lo Monaco at the Empire State Building in Manhattan, New York, New York

Above Manhattan: Cropped

294 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Empire State Building, Manhattan, New York City, New York

New York City is one of those cities where one must visit in order to grasp the size, density and vibrance. It puts things into perspective of how small we are on this earth. The city is alive and constantly changing. I think most New Yorkers would be able to spot tourists like myself from a mile away. I walked the streets staring upwards, in constant awe of the sheer size of the buildings.

Millions of people call this incredible city home. I never tire of exploring the streets and sites hidden in plain view in my own 7 ft wide print hanging in my home. Just as impressive as the view is the Empire State Building itself. Nearly 100 years old, the behemoth still stands taller than most buildings in Manhattan and is beautiful in its own right. At over 1200 feet tall, it permits us mere humans a birds-eye view of the world below. A chance to glimpse a moment in time of the ever-changing city and its occupants.

I took this photo on an early fall morning from the 86th floor observation deck of the Empire State Building. That was an experience in itself. I grew up across the river from Washington, D.C. where no building can be taller than the U.S. Capitol Building. Standing atop the Empire State Building, it’s impossible not to be overwhelmed by the grandeur of the bustling city. I knew I wanted to capture the entire view with the skyscrapers as far as I could see. Using my mid-range telephoto lens, I shot 28 photos (two rows of 14). Each input image was a blend of three exposures so I could pick up some detail in the deep shadows cast by the skyscrapers. Above Manhattan, I grew an appreciation for the millions of things happening at once that make up one of the largest and most vibrant cities in the world.

Explore this photo

New York City is one of those cities where one must visit in order to grasp the size, density and vibrance. It puts things into perspective of how small we are on this earth. The city is alive and constantly changing. I think most New Yorkers would be able to spot tourists like myself from a mile away. I walked the streets staring upwards, in constant awe of the sheer size of the buildings.

Millions of people call this incredible city home. I never tire of exploring the streets and sites hidden in plain view in my own 7 ft wide print hanging in my home. Just as impressive as the view is the Empire State Building itself. Nearly 100 years old, the behemoth still stands taller than most buildings in Manhattan and is beautiful in its own right. At over 1200 feet tall, it permits us mere humans a birds-eye view of the world below. A chance to glimpse a moment in time of the ever-changing city and its occupants.

I took this photo on an early fall morning from the 86th floor observation deck of the Empire State Building. That was an experience in itself. I grew up across the river from Washington, D.C. where no building can be taller than the U.S. Capitol Building. Standing atop the Empire State Building, it’s impossible not to be overwhelmed by the grandeur of the bustling city. I knew I wanted to capture the entire view with the skyscrapers as far as I could see. Using my mid-range telephoto lens, I shot 28 photos (two rows of 14). Each input image was a blend of three exposures so I could pick up some detail in the deep shadows cast by the skyscrapers. Above Manhattan, I grew an appreciation for the millions of things happening at once that make up one of the largest and most vibrant cities in the world.

Explore this photo

887 megapixels! A very high resolution, panorama VAST photo print of the Vancouver skyline at sunrise; photograph created by Scott Dimond in Coal Harbour, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Dawn at Coal Harbour, Vancouver

887 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Coal Harbour, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Summer in Vancouver is an amazing time with sunny and warm weather facilitating numerous outdoor activities. Vancouver is rated as one of the best cities in the world to live and there are endless things to see and do during the summer months.

One of the best places to explore during the summer months is Stanley Park which is located at the west end of Vancouver. Stanley Park is a 400-hectare natural rainforest and it provides scenic views of the water, mountains, sky, and majestic trees along its famous Seawall. This photo was created looking back at Vancouver from the Stanley Park seawall on the east side of the park between the Vancouver Rowing Club and the Royal Vancouver Yacht Club.

This particular August morning offered up beautiful underlit clouds while the calm seas produced wonderful reflections. The most serious challenge creating this exceptionally high-resolution VAST photo was the tide. As the numerous photos were being captured, a 4.2-meter tide was on its way out, causing the boats to appear lower in each photo and presenting some technical challenges in post-production, when all the individual photos were assembled into this wide view of the harbour.

Explore this photo

Summer in Vancouver is an amazing time with sunny and warm weather facilitating numerous outdoor activities. Vancouver is rated as one of the best cities in the world to live and there are endless things to see and do during the summer months.

One of the best places to explore during the summer months is Stanley Park which is located at the west end of Vancouver. Stanley Park is a 400-hectare natural rainforest and it provides scenic views of the water, mountains, sky, and majestic trees along its famous Seawall. This photo was created looking back at Vancouver from the Stanley Park seawall on the east side of the park between the Vancouver Rowing Club and the Royal Vancouver Yacht Club.

This particular August morning offered up beautiful underlit clouds while the calm seas produced wonderful reflections. The most serious challenge creating this exceptionally high-resolution VAST photo was the tide. As the numerous photos were being captured, a 4.2-meter tide was on its way out, causing the boats to appear lower in each photo and presenting some technical challenges in post-production, when all the individual photos were assembled into this wide view of the harbour.

Explore this photo

416 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of Manhattan; aerial photograph created by Tim Lo Monaco at the Empire State Building in Manhattan, New York City, New York

Above Manhattan

416 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Empire State Building, Manhattan, New York City, New York

New York City is one of those cities where one must visit in order to grasp the size, density and vibrance. It puts things into perspective of how small we are on this earth. The city is alive and constantly changing. I think most New Yorkers would be able to spot tourists like myself from a mile away. I walked the streets staring upwards, in constant awe of the sheer size of the buildings.

Millions of people call this incredible city home. I never tire of exploring the streets and sites hidden in plain view in my own 7 ft wide print hanging in my home. Just as impressive as the view is the Empire State Building itself. Nearly 100 years old, the behemoth still stands taller than most buildings in Manhattan and is beautiful in its own right. At over 1200 feet tall, it permits us mere humans a birds-eye view of the world below. A chance to glimpse a moment in time of the ever-changing city and its occupants.

I took this photo on an early fall morning from the 86th floor observation deck of the Empire State Building. That was an experience in itself. I grew up across the river from Washington, D.C. where no building can be taller than the U.S. Capitol Building. Standing atop the Empire State Building, it’s impossible not to be overwhelmed by the grandeur of the bustling city. I knew I wanted to capture the entire view with the skyscrapers as far as I could see. Using my mid-range telephoto lens, I shot 28 photos (two rows of 14). Each input image was a blend of three exposures so I could pick up some detail in the deep shadows cast by the skyscrapers. Above Manhattan, I grew an appreciation for the millions of things happening at once that make up one of the largest and most vibrant cities in the world.

Explore this photo

New York City is one of those cities where one must visit in order to grasp the size, density and vibrance. It puts things into perspective of how small we are on this earth. The city is alive and constantly changing. I think most New Yorkers would be able to spot tourists like myself from a mile away. I walked the streets staring upwards, in constant awe of the sheer size of the buildings.

Millions of people call this incredible city home. I never tire of exploring the streets and sites hidden in plain view in my own 7 ft wide print hanging in my home. Just as impressive as the view is the Empire State Building itself. Nearly 100 years old, the behemoth still stands taller than most buildings in Manhattan and is beautiful in its own right. At over 1200 feet tall, it permits us mere humans a birds-eye view of the world below. A chance to glimpse a moment in time of the ever-changing city and its occupants.

I took this photo on an early fall morning from the 86th floor observation deck of the Empire State Building. That was an experience in itself. I grew up across the river from Washington, D.C. where no building can be taller than the U.S. Capitol Building. Standing atop the Empire State Building, it’s impossible not to be overwhelmed by the grandeur of the bustling city. I knew I wanted to capture the entire view with the skyscrapers as far as I could see. Using my mid-range telephoto lens, I shot 28 photos (two rows of 14). Each input image was a blend of three exposures so I could pick up some detail in the deep shadows cast by the skyscrapers. Above Manhattan, I grew an appreciation for the millions of things happening at once that make up one of the largest and most vibrant cities in the world.

Explore this photo

925 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of a waterfall in a green forest; nature photograph created by Greg Probst in Sol Duc Falls, Olympic National Park

Sol Duc Falls

946 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Sol Duc Falls, Olympic National Park, Washington

Sol Duc falls is an iconic waterfall in the lush old growth rainforest of Olympic National Park on the Washington coast. The simple mile and a half walk to the falls reminds you and your senses of just how fresh fresh air can be.
Most day hikers stop at this bridge but those who want to see the stunning beauty of Olympic National Park must continue up to 7 Lakes Basin and the High Divide. For those who do and dare the Summer swarms of mosquitoes will be rewarded with breath taking views, wildflowers and a night sky so full of stars as to blow your mind.
The forest here is protected by being inside of a National Park but prior to the park being created this area had undergone cutting. What is seen today is mostly 2nd growth. There are some areas of virgin old growth forest. You'll recognize these areas by the fact the trees are 6 feet or larger in diameter.

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Sol Duc falls is an iconic waterfall in the lush old growth rainforest of Olympic National Park on the Washington coast. The simple mile and a half walk to the falls reminds you and your senses of just how fresh fresh air can be.
Most day hikers stop at this bridge but those who want to see the stunning beauty of Olympic National Park must continue up to 7 Lakes Basin and the High Divide. For those who do and dare the Summer swarms of mosquitoes will be rewarded with breath taking views, wildflowers and a night sky so full of stars as to blow your mind.
The forest here is protected by being inside of a National Park but prior to the park being created this area had undergone cutting. What is seen today is mostly 2nd growth. There are some areas of virgin old growth forest. You'll recognize these areas by the fact the trees are 6 feet or larger in diameter.

Explore this photo

570 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of a peaceful lake in the morning with some foggy mist rising; landscape photograph created by Scott Dimond in Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada

Foggy Morning

570 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada

This VAST photo was captured just north of Rampart Creek along the North Saskatchewan River in Banff National Park. The river is usually low and sifts course across braided channels in this area, but on this occasion, it was at its peak, spilling over the walking path all along the river.

A more detailed story is coming soon.

Explore this photo

This VAST photo was captured just north of Rampart Creek along the North Saskatchewan River in Banff National Park. The river is usually low and sifts course across braided channels in this area, but on this occasion, it was at its peak, spilling over the walking path all along the river.

A more detailed story is coming soon.

Explore this photo

479 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of a manmade rock wall texture; photograph created by Scott Dimond in Calgary, Alberta

Caged Rocks

479 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Calgary, Alberta

A gabion wall is a cage filled with rocks and has historically been used in civil engineering, road building, and landscaping. These days it is popular as a main architectural element in the interiors and exteriors of modern buildings.

When I came upon this wall I knew immediately that I needed to create a VAST photo of it. For me, it appeals to the cognitive process of visual search. Others may just want to fill an entire wall with a print and avoid stacking all those stones.

Explore this photo

A gabion wall is a cage filled with rocks and has historically been used in civil engineering, road building, and landscaping. These days it is popular as a main architectural element in the interiors and exteriors of modern buildings.

When I came upon this wall I knew immediately that I needed to create a VAST photo of it. For me, it appeals to the cognitive process of visual search. Others may just want to fill an entire wall with a print and avoid stacking all those stones.

Explore this photo

276 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of the Washington D.C. War Memorial; panorama photograph created by Tim Lo Monaco in D.C. War Memorial, National Mall, Washington, D.C.

D.C. War Memorial III

276 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
D.C. War Memorial, National Mall, Washington, D.C.

The District of Columbia War Memorial is the only city-centric monument on the National Mall. This memorial honors the 26,000 men and women from Washington, D.C. who served in World War I, with their names inscribed along the outer walls.

Construction completed in 1931 of this circular, open-air, Doric structure, and it was built almost entirely of Vermont marble. The monument rises 47 feet; with a diameter of 44 feet, it’s large enough to accommodate the entire U.S. Marine Band. It was intended that the structure be a memorial and a bandstand and that each concert would be a tribute to those who served and sacrificed in the war.

Keeping in line with the iconic architecture that comes to mind when thinking of D.C. monuments, the D.C. War Memorial fits perfectly into the very walkable National Mall. While I love the weather and green foliage during the warmer months, I am fascinated to see the forms of naked trees in the cold winter months. Ash Woods, nature’s counterbalance to the man-made structure keeps me coming back to photograph this location. The field of view of this particular image is about 180 degrees.

While not as well-known as other Washington, D.C. monuments, this memorial is a must-see. It is a peaceful place along the National Mall amidst a grove of mature elm, oak, maple, and beech trees in Ash Woods. The D.C. War Memorial itself is a beautiful structure and one that pays a much-deserved tribute to those Washingtonians who served in the “War to End All Wars”.

Explore this photo

The District of Columbia War Memorial is the only city-centric monument on the National Mall. This memorial honors the 26,000 men and women from Washington, D.C. who served in World War I, with their names inscribed along the outer walls.

Construction completed in 1931 of this circular, open-air, Doric structure, and it was built almost entirely of Vermont marble. The monument rises 47 feet; with a diameter of 44 feet, it’s large enough to accommodate the entire U.S. Marine Band. It was intended that the structure be a memorial and a bandstand and that each concert would be a tribute to those who served and sacrificed in the war.

Keeping in line with the iconic architecture that comes to mind when thinking of D.C. monuments, the D.C. War Memorial fits perfectly into the very walkable National Mall. While I love the weather and green foliage during the warmer months, I am fascinated to see the forms of naked trees in the cold winter months. Ash Woods, nature’s counterbalance to the man-made structure keeps me coming back to photograph this location. The field of view of this particular image is about 180 degrees.

While not as well-known as other Washington, D.C. monuments, this memorial is a must-see. It is a peaceful place along the National Mall amidst a grove of mature elm, oak, maple, and beech trees in Ash Woods. The D.C. War Memorial itself is a beautiful structure and one that pays a much-deserved tribute to those Washingtonians who served in the “War to End All Wars”.

Explore this photo

726 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of a mountain ridge at sunset; landscape photograph created by Duilio Fiorille in Balme, Ala Valley, Piedmont, Italy

Warm summits

726 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Balme, Ala Valley, Piedmont, Italy

Balme (so also in Piedmontese, Bàrmes in Franco-Provençal) is an Italian town of 110 inhabitants in the metropolitan city of Turin in Piedmont, inhabited since ancient times (14th Century).

Balme is the highest municipality in the Val d'Ala. The latter is part of the Graian Alps and is the central one of the three valleys that converge on Lanzo Torinese (Val grande di Lanzo, Val d'Ala and Valle di Viù), commonly known as Valli di Lanzo.The town owes its fame to the presence of water sources considered of great value; each house in the area has its own fountain gushing fresh water.

The name Balme, in the local dialect Bàrmes, derives from the word balma of Celtic origin which indicates the numerous rock shelters in the area.

Since 1922, the water collected at Pian della Mussa quenches the thirst of part of the city of Turin.

Regarding the photo, I was going down towards the valley after a day spent shooting the many beauties of the Valley in its highest part, called Pian della Mussa. While through the small village of Balme, I notice on the right a glimpse where the major peaks of the area are visible, illuminated by the warm light of the sunset. I ran the equipment (a Syrp motorized head that controls the super telephoto at 400mm) and composed the image as you see it now ...

Explore this photo

Balme (so also in Piedmontese, Bàrmes in Franco-Provençal) is an Italian town of 110 inhabitants in the metropolitan city of Turin in Piedmont, inhabited since ancient times (14th Century).

Balme is the highest municipality in the Val d'Ala. The latter is part of the Graian Alps and is the central one of the three valleys that converge on Lanzo Torinese (Val grande di Lanzo, Val d'Ala and Valle di Viù), commonly known as Valli di Lanzo.The town owes its fame to the presence of water sources considered of great value; each house in the area has its own fountain gushing fresh water.

The name Balme, in the local dialect Bàrmes, derives from the word balma of Celtic origin which indicates the numerous rock shelters in the area.

Since 1922, the water collected at Pian della Mussa quenches the thirst of part of the city of Turin.

Regarding the photo, I was going down towards the valley after a day spent shooting the many beauties of the Valley in its highest part, called Pian della Mussa. While through the small village of Balme, I notice on the right a glimpse where the major peaks of the area are visible, illuminated by the warm light of the sunset. I ran the equipment (a Syrp motorized head that controls the super telephoto at 400mm) and composed the image as you see it now ...

Explore this photo

276 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of the Washington D.C. War Memorial; panorama photograph created by Tim Lo Monaco in D.C. War Memorial, National Mall, Washington, D.C.

D.C. War Memorial II

269 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
D.C. War Memorial, National Mall, Washington, D.C.

The District of Columbia War Memorial is the only city-centric monument on the National Mall. This memorial honors the 26,000 men and women from Washington, D.C. who served in World War I, with their names inscribed along the outer walls.

Construction completed in 1931 of this circular, open-air, Doric structure, and it was built almost entirely of Vermont marble. The monument rises 47 feet; with a diameter of 44 feet, it’s large enough to accommodate the entire U.S. Marine Band. It was intended that the structure be a memorial and a bandstand and that each concert would be a tribute to those who served and sacrificed in the war.

Keeping in line with the iconic architecture that comes to mind when thinking of D.C. monuments, the D.C. War Memorial fits perfectly into the very walkable National Mall. While I love the weather and green foliage during the warmer months, I am fascinated to see the forms of naked trees in the colder months contrasting the crisp blue skies of winter. Ash Woods, nature’s counterbalance to the man-made structure keeps me coming back to photograph this location. The field of view of this particular image is about 280 degrees, nearly three times what a conventional wide-angle lens would provide.

While not as well-known as other Washington, D.C. monuments, this memorial is a must-see. It is a peaceful place along the National Mall amidst a grove of mature elm, oak, maple, and beech trees in Ash Woods. The D.C. War Memorial itself is a beautiful structure and one that pays a much-deserved tribute to those Washingtonians who served in the “War to End All Wars”.

Explore this photo

The District of Columbia War Memorial is the only city-centric monument on the National Mall. This memorial honors the 26,000 men and women from Washington, D.C. who served in World War I, with their names inscribed along the outer walls.

Construction completed in 1931 of this circular, open-air, Doric structure, and it was built almost entirely of Vermont marble. The monument rises 47 feet; with a diameter of 44 feet, it’s large enough to accommodate the entire U.S. Marine Band. It was intended that the structure be a memorial and a bandstand and that each concert would be a tribute to those who served and sacrificed in the war.

Keeping in line with the iconic architecture that comes to mind when thinking of D.C. monuments, the D.C. War Memorial fits perfectly into the very walkable National Mall. While I love the weather and green foliage during the warmer months, I am fascinated to see the forms of naked trees in the colder months contrasting the crisp blue skies of winter. Ash Woods, nature’s counterbalance to the man-made structure keeps me coming back to photograph this location. The field of view of this particular image is about 280 degrees, nearly three times what a conventional wide-angle lens would provide.

While not as well-known as other Washington, D.C. monuments, this memorial is a must-see. It is a peaceful place along the National Mall amidst a grove of mature elm, oak, maple, and beech trees in Ash Woods. The D.C. War Memorial itself is a beautiful structure and one that pays a much-deserved tribute to those Washingtonians who served in the “War to End All Wars”.

Explore this photo

365 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of the Washington D.C. War Memorial; photograph created by Tim Lo Monaco in D.C. War Memorial, National Mall, Washington, D.C.

D.C. War Memorial I

365 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
D.C. War Memorial, National Mall, Washington, D.C.

The District of Columbia War Memorial is the only city-centric monument on the National Mall. This memorial honors the 26,000 men and women from Washington, D.C. who served in World War I, with their names inscribed along the outer walls.

Construction completed in 1931 of this circular, open-air, Doric structure, and it was built almost entirely of Vermont marble. The monument rises 47 feet; with a diameter of 44 feet, it’s large enough to accommodate the entire U.S. Marine Band. It was intended that the structure be a memorial and a bandstand and that each concert would be a tribute to those who served and sacrificed in the war.

Keeping in line with the iconic architecture that comes to mind when thinking of D.C. monuments, the D.C. War Memorial fits perfectly into the very walkable National Mall. While I love the weather and green foliage during the warmer months, I am fascinated to see the forms of naked trees in the colder months. Ash Woods, nature’s counterbalance to the man-made structure keeps me coming back to photograph this location. This was one of my first experiments with panoramic stitching in 2012 after being “bitten by the bug”. The simplicity of leading lines, colors, and framing that the trees provide the monument make this one of my personal favorites of my Washington, D.C. images.

While not as well-known as other Washington, D.C. monuments, this memorial is a must-see. It is a peaceful place along the National Mall amidst a grove of mature elm, oak, maple, and beech trees in Ash Woods. The D.C. War Memorial itself is a beautiful structure and one that pays a much-deserved tribute to those Washingtonians who served in the “War to End All Wars”.

Explore this photo

The District of Columbia War Memorial is the only city-centric monument on the National Mall. This memorial honors the 26,000 men and women from Washington, D.C. who served in World War I, with their names inscribed along the outer walls.

Construction completed in 1931 of this circular, open-air, Doric structure, and it was built almost entirely of Vermont marble. The monument rises 47 feet; with a diameter of 44 feet, it’s large enough to accommodate the entire U.S. Marine Band. It was intended that the structure be a memorial and a bandstand and that each concert would be a tribute to those who served and sacrificed in the war.

Keeping in line with the iconic architecture that comes to mind when thinking of D.C. monuments, the D.C. War Memorial fits perfectly into the very walkable National Mall. While I love the weather and green foliage during the warmer months, I am fascinated to see the forms of naked trees in the colder months. Ash Woods, nature’s counterbalance to the man-made structure keeps me coming back to photograph this location. This was one of my first experiments with panoramic stitching in 2012 after being “bitten by the bug”. The simplicity of leading lines, colors, and framing that the trees provide the monument make this one of my personal favorites of my Washington, D.C. images.

While not as well-known as other Washington, D.C. monuments, this memorial is a must-see. It is a peaceful place along the National Mall amidst a grove of mature elm, oak, maple, and beech trees in Ash Woods. The D.C. War Memorial itself is a beautiful structure and one that pays a much-deserved tribute to those Washingtonians who served in the “War to End All Wars”.

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382 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of the Dallas, Texas skyline at dusk; panorama photograph created by Phil Crawshay in Dallas, Texas

Dallas over the Trinity

382 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Dallas, Texas

The incredible Dallas skyline, photographed from the Trinity River Skyline Trail. Taking center stage is the Bank of America Tower with the iconic Reunion Tower to it's right. Taken just after the sun went down using a 250mm lens to ensure extreme detail even when zoomed in.
The shot took 3 attempts as this particular area is a bit of a wind tunnel. At this focal length, even the slightest gust of wind can shake the lens which results in unusable blur. On the third attempt, the wind had died down and I was able to shoot each position at the moments the wind had died down.

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The incredible Dallas skyline, photographed from the Trinity River Skyline Trail. Taking center stage is the Bank of America Tower with the iconic Reunion Tower to it's right. Taken just after the sun went down using a 250mm lens to ensure extreme detail even when zoomed in.
The shot took 3 attempts as this particular area is a bit of a wind tunnel. At this focal length, even the slightest gust of wind can shake the lens which results in unusable blur. On the third attempt, the wind had died down and I was able to shoot each position at the moments the wind had died down.

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1,647 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of an abandoned house; landscape photograph created by Scott Dimond in

Prairie Remnant #1 (Color)

1,647 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Wheatland County, Alberta, Canada

Across the wide-open expanses of the Canadian prairies, hidden down seldom-traveled roads and in isolated locations, sits the remnants of the earlier settlers to these areas. There are old farm equipment and barns to be found but my real quest is always for old abandoned homesteads. These old, empty, and dilapidated homes have always fascinated me, both for their current and changing state and also for what they once were and who lived in them.

When I look at them and their remoteness at the time, I can only think of the resilience of their former occupants. Many were often separated from family and suffered years of hardship and loneliness. There was the endless farming labor during the few warmer months this northern climate has to offer, all with a goal to be prepared to survive the long, cold, and merciless winter that would follow.

Some of these homesteads were simple with rectangular footprints and only a few rooms to house large families. Others were larger with two stories and with the luxury of sitting rooms and fine woodworking. But no matter what end of this spectrum these houses sat, today they are in the same predicament; long abandoned and left to the elements.

And year after year those elements take their toll. Each return visit finds an old home in slightly worse condition or gone completely, often burnt or bulldozed by the landowner, never to be photographed again.

In creating this series of VAST images, I wanted to highlight a select group of characterful abandoned homesteads that remain surrounded only by the crop fields that would have been worked by the first occupants. And at the same time, I wanted to capture what might be the last photograph of them, at the extremely high resolution that only VAST photos can deliver.

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Across the wide-open expanses of the Canadian prairies, hidden down seldom-traveled roads and in isolated locations, sits the remnants of the earlier settlers to these areas. There are old farm equipment and barns to be found but my real quest is always for old abandoned homesteads. These old, empty, and dilapidated homes have always fascinated me, both for their current and changing state and also for what they once were and who lived in them.

When I look at them and their remoteness at the time, I can only think of the resilience of their former occupants. Many were often separated from family and suffered years of hardship and loneliness. There was the endless farming labor during the few warmer months this northern climate has to offer, all with a goal to be prepared to survive the long, cold, and merciless winter that would follow.

Some of these homesteads were simple with rectangular footprints and only a few rooms to house large families. Others were larger with two stories and with the luxury of sitting rooms and fine woodworking. But no matter what end of this spectrum these houses sat, today they are in the same predicament; long abandoned and left to the elements.

And year after year those elements take their toll. Each return visit finds an old home in slightly worse condition or gone completely, often burnt or bulldozed by the landowner, never to be photographed again.

In creating this series of VAST images, I wanted to highlight a select group of characterful abandoned homesteads that remain surrounded only by the crop fields that would have been worked by the first occupants. And at the same time, I wanted to capture what might be the last photograph of them, at the extremely high resolution that only VAST photos can deliver.

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1,052 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of an abandoned house in a field on a prairie; landscape photograph created by Scott Dimond in Foothills County, Alberta, Canada

Prairie Remnant #2 (Color)

1,052 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Foothills County, Alberta, Canada

Across the wide-open expanses of the Canadian prairies, hidden down seldom-traveled roads and in isolated locations, sits the remnants of the earlier settlers to these areas. There are old farm equipment and barns to be found but my real quest is always for old abandoned homesteads. These old, empty, and dilapidated homes have always fascinated me, both for their current and changing state and also for what they once were and who lived in them.

When I look at them and their remoteness at the time, I can only think of the resilience of their former occupants. Many were often separated from family and suffered years of hardship and loneliness. There was the endless farming labor during the few warmer months this northern climate has to offer, all with a goal to be prepared to survive the long, cold, and merciless winter that would follow.

Some of these homesteads were simple with rectangular footprints and only a few rooms to house large families. Others were larger with two stories and with the luxury of sitting rooms and fine woodworking. But no matter what end of this spectrum these houses sat, today they are in the same predicament; long abandoned and left to the elements.

And year after year those elements take their toll. Each return visit finds an old home in slightly worse condition or gone completely, often burnt or bulldozed by the landowner, never to be photographed again.

In creating this series of VAST images, I wanted to highlight a select group of characterful abandoned homesteads that remain surrounded only by the crop fields that would have been worked by the first occupants. And at the same time, I wanted to capture what might be the last photograph of them, at the extremely high resolution that only VAST photos can deliver.

Explore this photo

Across the wide-open expanses of the Canadian prairies, hidden down seldom-traveled roads and in isolated locations, sits the remnants of the earlier settlers to these areas. There are old farm equipment and barns to be found but my real quest is always for old abandoned homesteads. These old, empty, and dilapidated homes have always fascinated me, both for their current and changing state and also for what they once were and who lived in them.

When I look at them and their remoteness at the time, I can only think of the resilience of their former occupants. Many were often separated from family and suffered years of hardship and loneliness. There was the endless farming labor during the few warmer months this northern climate has to offer, all with a goal to be prepared to survive the long, cold, and merciless winter that would follow.

Some of these homesteads were simple with rectangular footprints and only a few rooms to house large families. Others were larger with two stories and with the luxury of sitting rooms and fine woodworking. But no matter what end of this spectrum these houses sat, today they are in the same predicament; long abandoned and left to the elements.

And year after year those elements take their toll. Each return visit finds an old home in slightly worse condition or gone completely, often burnt or bulldozed by the landowner, never to be photographed again.

In creating this series of VAST images, I wanted to highlight a select group of characterful abandoned homesteads that remain surrounded only by the crop fields that would have been worked by the first occupants. And at the same time, I wanted to capture what might be the last photograph of them, at the extremely high resolution that only VAST photos can deliver.

Explore this photo