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4,207 megapixels! A very high resolution, abstract of a church; creative photograph created by Tim Lo Monaco in The Riverside Church, Manhattan, New York, New York

Riverside Church Spherical Panorama 1

4,207 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
The Riverside Church, Manhattan, New York, New York

The Riverside Church in Manhattan, is situated at one of the highest points of New York City, overlooking the Hudson River and 122nd Street. Riverside was conceived and built by John D. Rockefeller. It is 100 feet wide and covers two city blocks. Construction began in 1927 with the first service held on October 5, 1930. The Nave seats nearly 2,000 worshipers. The tower rises nearly 400 feet high and houses the carillon’s 20-ton bourdon bell, the largest tuned bell in the world.

I stumbled upon this church during a visit to New York City with my wife in 2013. I was truly amazed at its size and splendor, yet it didn’t feel out of place considering the large scale of the metropolis in which it resides. But how to capture this grandeur in a photo? Take a photo of everything and make it a single photo! While not to everyone’s taste; I’m so fascinated with surreal perspective captured in the final image.

To create a spherical panorama or “little planet”, imagine taking photos of every angle as viewed from where you stand, including the points directly under your feet and straight above you. Combine all those photos into a single image and the end-result would be the view from inside a three-dimensional sphere. Flatten that into two-dimensions and you have what you see here. I chose the vaulted ceiling directly above me as the center point.

The symmetry of twisting lines and bending shapes grab my attention, but even more interesting is the incredible amount of detail found when delving deeper into the image, from the wood-worked carvings, engravings, and stained glass windows. With its impressive architecture and craftsmanship, it was well-worth the hike uptown in Manhattan to visit.

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The Riverside Church in Manhattan, is situated at one of the highest points of New York City, overlooking the Hudson River and 122nd Street. Riverside was conceived and built by John D. Rockefeller. It is 100 feet wide and covers two city blocks. Construction began in 1927 with the first service held on October 5, 1930. The Nave seats nearly 2,000 worshipers. The tower rises nearly 400 feet high and houses the carillon’s 20-ton bourdon bell, the largest tuned bell in the world.

I stumbled upon this church during a visit to New York City with my wife in 2013. I was truly amazed at its size and splendor, yet it didn’t feel out of place considering the large scale of the metropolis in which it resides. But how to capture this grandeur in a photo? Take a photo of everything and make it a single photo! While not to everyone’s taste; I’m so fascinated with surreal perspective captured in the final image.

To create a spherical panorama or “little planet”, imagine taking photos of every angle as viewed from where you stand, including the points directly under your feet and straight above you. Combine all those photos into a single image and the end-result would be the view from inside a three-dimensional sphere. Flatten that into two-dimensions and you have what you see here. I chose the vaulted ceiling directly above me as the center point.

The symmetry of twisting lines and bending shapes grab my attention, but even more interesting is the incredible amount of detail found when delving deeper into the image, from the wood-worked carvings, engravings, and stained glass windows. With its impressive architecture and craftsmanship, it was well-worth the hike uptown in Manhattan to visit.

Explore this photo

1,295 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of winter scene of a river with snow and evergreen trees; nature photograph created by Scott Dimond in Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada

Maligne River - Winter view: Cropped

1,295 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada

I can’t believe it was that long ago! This past December (2020) I headed up into Jasper National Park with the idea of re-visiting some of my favourite photo locations from a previous trip and seeing if I could pull off creating ultra-high-resolution VAST version of some of my favourite images from that trip. I remember the previous trip well. It was also in December and it was cold, really cold. Temperatures were -30 C / -22 F during the day. And there was a ton of snow, so much so that I became trapped in Jasper for three extra days as all the highways in or out were closed. I spent many days exploring and photographing locations in complete isolation. There was just no one around. Looking back at my archives, I discovered that memorable trip was way back in 2007. I’ve been up there many times since, but that one trip really stands out.

Fast-forward to my most recent trip and one of the spots I really wanted to get back to is a great viewpoint looking down the Maligne River from a spot between Maligne Lake and Medicine Lake. I remember the vantage point well and the image I had previously created there always stuck with me. When I arrived this time there was less snow on the rocks in the river which turned out to be fantastic as each rock was instead surrounded by the most beautiful of ice formations. I set up my VAST equipment and got to work. It was around -15 C/ 5 F which was considerably warmer than that visit back in 2007 but then again, back in 2007 I was not standing in one place for an hour taking almost 1,800 photos of a single scene. I went through two sets of chemical hand warmers during that hour of shooting and even then, in the end, my fingers were so cold I had trouble handling my keys to get my vehicle started. But it was worth it. The return visit to this great view of the Maligne River was a success.

Explore this photo

I can’t believe it was that long ago! This past December (2020) I headed up into Jasper National Park with the idea of re-visiting some of my favourite photo locations from a previous trip and seeing if I could pull off creating ultra-high-resolution VAST version of some of my favourite images from that trip. I remember the previous trip well. It was also in December and it was cold, really cold. Temperatures were -30 C / -22 F during the day. And there was a ton of snow, so much so that I became trapped in Jasper for three extra days as all the highways in or out were closed. I spent many days exploring and photographing locations in complete isolation. There was just no one around. Looking back at my archives, I discovered that memorable trip was way back in 2007. I’ve been up there many times since, but that one trip really stands out.

Fast-forward to my most recent trip and one of the spots I really wanted to get back to is a great viewpoint looking down the Maligne River from a spot between Maligne Lake and Medicine Lake. I remember the vantage point well and the image I had previously created there always stuck with me. When I arrived this time there was less snow on the rocks in the river which turned out to be fantastic as each rock was instead surrounded by the most beautiful of ice formations. I set up my VAST equipment and got to work. It was around -15 C/ 5 F which was considerably warmer than that visit back in 2007 but then again, back in 2007 I was not standing in one place for an hour taking almost 1,800 photos of a single scene. I went through two sets of chemical hand warmers during that hour of shooting and even then, in the end, my fingers were so cold I had trouble handling my keys to get my vehicle started. But it was worth it. The return visit to this great view of the Maligne River was a success.

Explore this photo

2,578 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of a river in winter with snow and evergreen trees; nature photograph created by Scott Dimond in Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada

Maligne River - Winter view

2,578 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada

I can’t believe it was that long ago! This past December (2020) I headed up into Jasper National Park with the idea of re-visiting some of my favourite photo locations from a previous trip and seeing if I could pull off creating an ultra-high-resolution VAST version of some of my favourite images from that trip. I remember the previous trip well. It was also in December and it was cold, really cold. Temperatures were -30 C / -22 F during the day. And there was a ton of snow, so much so that I became trapped in Jasper for three extra days as all the highways in or out were closed. I spent many days exploring and photographing locations in complete isolation. There was just no one around. Looking back at my archives, I discovered that memorable trip was way back in 2007. I’ve been up there many times since, but that one trip really stands out.

Fast-forward to my most recent trip and one of the spots I really wanted to get back to is a great viewpoint looking down the Maligne River from a spot between Maligne Lake and Medicine Lake. I remember the vantage point well and the image I had previously created there always stuck with me. When I arrived this time there was less snow on the rocks in the river which turned out to be fantastic as each rock was instead surrounded by the most beautiful of ice formations. I set up my VAST equipment and got to work. It was around -15 C/ 5 F which was considerably warmer than that visit back in 2007 but then again, back in 2007 I was not standing in one place for an hour taking almost 1,800 photos of a single scene. I went through two sets of chemical hand warmers during that hour of shooting and even then, in the end, my fingers were so cold I had trouble handling my keys to get my vehicle started. But it was worth it. The return visit to this great view of the Maligne River was a success.

Explore this photo

I can’t believe it was that long ago! This past December (2020) I headed up into Jasper National Park with the idea of re-visiting some of my favourite photo locations from a previous trip and seeing if I could pull off creating an ultra-high-resolution VAST version of some of my favourite images from that trip. I remember the previous trip well. It was also in December and it was cold, really cold. Temperatures were -30 C / -22 F during the day. And there was a ton of snow, so much so that I became trapped in Jasper for three extra days as all the highways in or out were closed. I spent many days exploring and photographing locations in complete isolation. There was just no one around. Looking back at my archives, I discovered that memorable trip was way back in 2007. I’ve been up there many times since, but that one trip really stands out.

Fast-forward to my most recent trip and one of the spots I really wanted to get back to is a great viewpoint looking down the Maligne River from a spot between Maligne Lake and Medicine Lake. I remember the vantage point well and the image I had previously created there always stuck with me. When I arrived this time there was less snow on the rocks in the river which turned out to be fantastic as each rock was instead surrounded by the most beautiful of ice formations. I set up my VAST equipment and got to work. It was around -15 C/ 5 F which was considerably warmer than that visit back in 2007 but then again, back in 2007 I was not standing in one place for an hour taking almost 1,800 photos of a single scene. I went through two sets of chemical hand warmers during that hour of shooting and even then, in the end, my fingers were so cold I had trouble handling my keys to get my vehicle started. But it was worth it. The return visit to this great view of the Maligne River was a success.

Explore this photo

1,337 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of an artistic winter scene; landscape photograph created by Scott Dimond in Wheatland County, Alberta, Canada

Frosted Tree Line

1,337 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Wheatland County, Alberta, Canada

This image was several years in the making or should I say several years in the waiting. I had come across this wonderful series of tree lines a few years back and thought it would make a wonderful image with the fields covered in snow and the trees covered in hoar frost. Photographing it with snow-covered fields would have been easy in the years since but being there during a heavy hoar frost event was another matter.

The term “hoar” comes from Old English meaning “to show signs of old age” and within the context of frost, refers to trees looking like they are covered in white hair. When cold winter conditions are just right, hoar frost creates layers of feather-like white crystals on tree branches. At times, its formation can be very localized, appearing in one area but not in other areas just kilometers apart. And that became the challenge. I needed a major hoar frost event so that when I was seeing it at my home, I knew there would be a good chance of it also occurring 80 kilometers away where these trees stand.

That event finally happened in the last days of 2020 and I was thrilled to see these trees completely covered in hoar frost after driving to the location. It was very cold and the time it took to capture this VAST image took its toll on my fingers and toes, but I finally got the image that had been in my mind’s eye for all those years.

Explore this photo

This image was several years in the making or should I say several years in the waiting. I had come across this wonderful series of tree lines a few years back and thought it would make a wonderful image with the fields covered in snow and the trees covered in hoar frost. Photographing it with snow-covered fields would have been easy in the years since but being there during a heavy hoar frost event was another matter.

The term “hoar” comes from Old English meaning “to show signs of old age” and within the context of frost, refers to trees looking like they are covered in white hair. When cold winter conditions are just right, hoar frost creates layers of feather-like white crystals on tree branches. At times, its formation can be very localized, appearing in one area but not in other areas just kilometers apart. And that became the challenge. I needed a major hoar frost event so that when I was seeing it at my home, I knew there would be a good chance of it also occurring 80 kilometers away where these trees stand.

That event finally happened in the last days of 2020 and I was thrilled to see these trees completely covered in hoar frost after driving to the location. It was very cold and the time it took to capture this VAST image took its toll on my fingers and toes, but I finally got the image that had been in my mind’s eye for all those years.

Explore this photo

357 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of a river with evergreen trees and a mountain; nature photograph created by Scott Rinckenberger in Middle Fork of Snoqualmie River, North Bend, Washington

Fall Turns to Winter in Snoqualmie Valley

357 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Middle Fork of Snoqualmie River, North Bend, Washington

On the shore of the Middle Fork of the Snoqualmie River, massive trees make the most of the narrow strip of land between the river and the steep mountains above. Here, deciduous trees such as the big leaf maple host literal tons of mosses and ferns, while an assortment of evergreen trees including western red cedars, sitka spruces and Douglas fir trees vie for the title of the greatest tree in the region. The jury is still out.

At the end of fall, when the big trees have shed their leaves, revealing draping curtains of green, the underbrush makes a final showing of autumn colors and turn every shade of yellow, orange and red. Paired with the blue, snowy peaks above, this is perhaps one of the most colorful scenes in all of nature.

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On the shore of the Middle Fork of the Snoqualmie River, massive trees make the most of the narrow strip of land between the river and the steep mountains above. Here, deciduous trees such as the big leaf maple host literal tons of mosses and ferns, while an assortment of evergreen trees including western red cedars, sitka spruces and Douglas fir trees vie for the title of the greatest tree in the region. The jury is still out.

At the end of fall, when the big trees have shed their leaves, revealing draping curtains of green, the underbrush makes a final showing of autumn colors and turn every shade of yellow, orange and red. Paired with the blue, snowy peaks above, this is perhaps one of the most colorful scenes in all of nature.

Explore this photo

379 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of a road in a forest in autumn; nature photograph created by Scott Rinckenberger in Reinig Road Sycamore Corridor, Snoqualmie, Washington

The Reinig Road Sycamore Corridor

379 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Reinig Road Sycamore Corridor, Snoqualmie, Washington

Planted in 1925 by the local lumber company, each of these mighty sycamore trees used to mark the placement of a house in the riverside neighborhood of the Snoqualmie Falls Mill Town. All of the houses have since been moved, but nearing a century old, the trees are still a thriving reminder of a time gone by, and of the endless progression of nature.

In every time of year, this tree-lined country road is a captivating sight, whether providing a dappled, green tunnel of shade in summer, or a haunting study of skeletal form in the winter. But the finest time to visit may be the fall, when colors range from the brightest day-glow yellow to the richest greens, and the arms of the trees show their beautiful flowing lines.

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Planted in 1925 by the local lumber company, each of these mighty sycamore trees used to mark the placement of a house in the riverside neighborhood of the Snoqualmie Falls Mill Town. All of the houses have since been moved, but nearing a century old, the trees are still a thriving reminder of a time gone by, and of the endless progression of nature.

In every time of year, this tree-lined country road is a captivating sight, whether providing a dappled, green tunnel of shade in summer, or a haunting study of skeletal form in the winter. But the finest time to visit may be the fall, when colors range from the brightest day-glow yellow to the richest greens, and the arms of the trees show their beautiful flowing lines.

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217 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of a pathway in a forest; nature photograph created by Scott Rinckenberger in CCC Trail, Middle Fork Trailhead, Middle Fork Snoqualmie River, Washington

Straight Path through a Pacific Northwest Forest

217 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
CCC Trail, Middle Fork Snoqualmie River, Washington

The competition is fierce, but the rewards are great for the large, second growth trees of the Snoqualmie Valley in Washington State. With a glacially-sourced, nutrient rich river flowing endlessly through the heart of these forested mountains, and stacked against walls of granite which wring moisture out of Pacific storm systems in buckets, these trees grow tall and straight in a race for sunlight.

Here and there, humans have artfully crafted pathways through these dense forests. Simple, smooth, soft trails which invite you to walk slowly and take it all in.

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The competition is fierce, but the rewards are great for the large, second growth trees of the Snoqualmie Valley in Washington State. With a glacially-sourced, nutrient rich river flowing endlessly through the heart of these forested mountains, and stacked against walls of granite which wring moisture out of Pacific storm systems in buckets, these trees grow tall and straight in a race for sunlight.

Here and there, humans have artfully crafted pathways through these dense forests. Simple, smooth, soft trails which invite you to walk slowly and take it all in.

Explore this photo

250 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of a tree in a forest in the pacific northwest; nature photograph created by Scott Rinckenberger in CCC Trail, Middle Fork Trailhead, Middle Fork Snoqualmie River, Washington

Leaning Tree in Pacific Northwest Forest

250 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
CCC Trail, Middle Fork Trailhead, Middle Fork Snoqualmie River, Washington

A beautifully closed system, the verdant forests of the Pacific Northwest are incredibly self-sustaining, as nutrients, water, minerals, energy, and even, some say, a form of communication passes among the trees above and the forest floor below.

In these environments, the death of a tree is only part of that tree's story. Once part of the forest floor, it will provide for decades of future growth as mosses, fungi, bushes, and eventually other trees build homes built on the nutrients of the fallen tree.

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A beautifully closed system, the verdant forests of the Pacific Northwest are incredibly self-sustaining, as nutrients, water, minerals, energy, and even, some say, a form of communication passes among the trees above and the forest floor below.

In these environments, the death of a tree is only part of that tree's story. Once part of the forest floor, it will provide for decades of future growth as mosses, fungi, bushes, and eventually other trees build homes built on the nutrients of the fallen tree.

Explore this photo

292 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of a winding pathway in a forest; nature photograph created by Scott Rinckenberger in CCC Trail, Middle Fork Trailhead, Middle Fork of the Snoqualmie River, Washington

Winding Pathway in Pacific Northwest Forest

292 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
CCC Trail, Middle Fork of the Snoqualmie River, Washington

While dark, overcast November skies remove color from many kinds of landscape, in the water-greedy forests of the Pacific Northwest, the return to wet, heavy skies signal an autumnal rebirth as mosses, ferns and fungi of all kinds burst into colorful life after the hot summer dormancy.

In one such forest in the Middle Fork Valley of the Snoqualmie River, a windy, brick colored pathway of dirt as soft as a carpet, beckons the forest wanderer to walk ever deeper into this cathedral of sylvan perfection.

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While dark, overcast November skies remove color from many kinds of landscape, in the water-greedy forests of the Pacific Northwest, the return to wet, heavy skies signal an autumnal rebirth as mosses, ferns and fungi of all kinds burst into colorful life after the hot summer dormancy.

In one such forest in the Middle Fork Valley of the Snoqualmie River, a windy, brick colored pathway of dirt as soft as a carpet, beckons the forest wanderer to walk ever deeper into this cathedral of sylvan perfection.

Explore this photo

523 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of mountains and stars; landscape astrophotograph created by Paul Wilson in Peak Hill, Canterbury, New Zealand

The Peak

523 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Peak Hill, Canterbury, New Zealand

A 180-degree panorama from Peak Hill, New Zealand.
I believe this could be the first Astro taken from up here!
The Carina Nebula can be seen at the top of the sky, Large Magellanic Cloud to the right, and some awesome airglow from atomic oxygen excitation near the horizon.

I haven’t put this much work into a shot before!

I had a crazy idea, hike up Peak Hill with most of my photography equipment for panoramic views of the surrounding landscape. I was 10 minutes into the extremely steep hike when I realised my 26.5kg bag was too heavy, but I had to keep going, I had to complete my plan. It was a slow grind over 2.5 hours with quite a few stops, the start of the track just goes straight up, with marble-like rocks on hard clay, making the track very slippery (coming down was a lot worse and I took a couple of spills but was fine)

I finally made it to the top, only to have the wind pick right up, there needs to be virtually zero wind when shooting long exposures, tracked panoramas are no exception.
This shot was my third attempt, I started the image sequence and the wind suddenly dropped! It stayed that way for 40 minutes, just as I completed the last frame of the panorama the wind hit hard, I was so lucky to be able to pull it off.

Then it was time to leave, the sky was getting brighter and I began my descent.
This one-shot took 4 hours of driving, 5 hours hiking, 7 hours standing on the hill, and 8 hours putting it all together, painfully stitching and blending the shots.

Explore this photo

A 180-degree panorama from Peak Hill, New Zealand.
I believe this could be the first Astro taken from up here!
The Carina Nebula can be seen at the top of the sky, Large Magellanic Cloud to the right, and some awesome airglow from atomic oxygen excitation near the horizon.

I haven’t put this much work into a shot before!

I had a crazy idea, hike up Peak Hill with most of my photography equipment for panoramic views of the surrounding landscape. I was 10 minutes into the extremely steep hike when I realised my 26.5kg bag was too heavy, but I had to keep going, I had to complete my plan. It was a slow grind over 2.5 hours with quite a few stops, the start of the track just goes straight up, with marble-like rocks on hard clay, making the track very slippery (coming down was a lot worse and I took a couple of spills but was fine)

I finally made it to the top, only to have the wind pick right up, there needs to be virtually zero wind when shooting long exposures, tracked panoramas are no exception.
This shot was my third attempt, I started the image sequence and the wind suddenly dropped! It stayed that way for 40 minutes, just as I completed the last frame of the panorama the wind hit hard, I was so lucky to be able to pull it off.

Then it was time to leave, the sky was getting brighter and I began my descent.
This one-shot took 4 hours of driving, 5 hours hiking, 7 hours standing on the hill, and 8 hours putting it all together, painfully stitching and blending the shots.

Explore this photo

504 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of colorful houses in Italy in the snow; landscape photograph created by Duilio Fiorille in Diano D

Diano d'Alba Houses

504 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Diano D'Alba, Cuneo, Piedmont, Italy

Diano d'Alba (Dian in the typical dialect of Piedmont) is an Italian town of 3 603 inhabitants, located in the province of Cuneo in Piedmont.

The peculiarity of this ancient village, one of the most beautiful in Italy is that it is located on the top of a hill that allows a 360 degree view of all the Langhe, a rich land cultivated exclusively with rich vineyards, which produce some of the best wines in the world as quality.

The Langhe are an area of excellence in the Piedmont region, located in the North West of Italy.
Since the Middle Ages, grapes have been cultivated in these areas to make wine and over the centuries the techniques have always improved, up to the very precious current wines.

The Langhe area is very vast and contains a large part of the province of Cuneo, the capital. An infinite series of hills and slopes, completely planted with vines, all arranged in strict order for kilometers. Wine producers love their land and their vineyards and, especially since the post-war period, they have been able to recover and create an area that attracts tourists, investors and lovers of good food, refined wines and top-level, renowned and sought-after accommodation facilities. by people who come from all over the world.

In this photo of mine you can admire the colorful houses of Diano d'Alba, all frescoed with vivid and cheerful colors, built close to each other in the typical structure of medieval villages, in the highest part of the town that dominates the surrounding area.

Explore this photo

Diano d'Alba (Dian in the typical dialect of Piedmont) is an Italian town of 3 603 inhabitants, located in the province of Cuneo in Piedmont.

The peculiarity of this ancient village, one of the most beautiful in Italy is that it is located on the top of a hill that allows a 360 degree view of all the Langhe, a rich land cultivated exclusively with rich vineyards, which produce some of the best wines in the world as quality.

The Langhe are an area of excellence in the Piedmont region, located in the North West of Italy.
Since the Middle Ages, grapes have been cultivated in these areas to make wine and over the centuries the techniques have always improved, up to the very precious current wines.

The Langhe area is very vast and contains a large part of the province of Cuneo, the capital. An infinite series of hills and slopes, completely planted with vines, all arranged in strict order for kilometers. Wine producers love their land and their vineyards and, especially since the post-war period, they have been able to recover and create an area that attracts tourists, investors and lovers of good food, refined wines and top-level, renowned and sought-after accommodation facilities. by people who come from all over the world.

In this photo of mine you can admire the colorful houses of Diano d'Alba, all frescoed with vivid and cheerful colors, built close to each other in the typical structure of medieval villages, in the highest part of the town that dominates the surrounding area.

Explore this photo

223 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of Arlington Memorial Bridge at sunset with the Potomac River frozen; photograph created by Tim Lo Monaco in Arlington Memorial Bridge, Potomac River, Washington, D.C.

Arlington Memorial Bridge at Sunset

223 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Arlington Memorial Bridge, Potomac River, Washington, D.C.

Designed as a memorial symbolizing reunification of the North and South after the Civil War, Arlington Memorial Bridge links the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., and Arlington House, as well as Arlington National Cemetery, in Arlington, Virginia. A neoclassical stone-arch bridge crossing the Potomac River, construction was completed in 1932. Memorial Bridge defines the western end of the National Mall.

Washington, D.C. has four distinct seasons, and while it has a milder winter than the northern states, it usually experiences some very cold days during winter. After a week-long cold spell, the Potomac River itself froze which it rarely does. I knew I wanted to get a shot of the iconic bridge and include the textures of the ice. As sunset transitioned to twilight, the bridge framed the Rosslyn skyline across the Potomac River in Arlington, Virginia. With numb fingers I began the series of images.

This photo is a crop of an eighteen-image stitch, each input image comprised of four bracketed exposures to capture the wide dynamic range of the scene. With the subtle richness of the colors in the clear winter sky, an ethereal mood was set for the bridge spanning the frozen river. I chose to capture this with a mid-range macro lens for its crisp optics and shot a stitched panorama to achieve the depth and composition I envisioned which would have been impossible with a wide-angle lens.

Compositional flexibility aside, the VAST method allows for the high resolution necessary to create an immaculate fine art photographic print at any size. While not my largest panoramic stitch, this was made with eighteen images of an already high-resolution digital camera. The relative enlargements of each input image are minuscule when making a large format photographic print compared to enlarging a single photo so the resulting photo will retain even the smallest details.

I’m fascinated with the technical side and challenge it was to make the image, but most importantly I like the feeling this image provokes. Even on the coldest winter days, the monuments are beautiful to see. The mastery of the stonework ubiquitous in Washington, D.C. always impresses me. I’m glad I tried my luck with the cold and made my way here to capture this fleeting moment in time.

Explore this photo

Designed as a memorial symbolizing reunification of the North and South after the Civil War, Arlington Memorial Bridge links the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., and Arlington House, as well as Arlington National Cemetery, in Arlington, Virginia. A neoclassical stone-arch bridge crossing the Potomac River, construction was completed in 1932. Memorial Bridge defines the western end of the National Mall.

Washington, D.C. has four distinct seasons, and while it has a milder winter than the northern states, it usually experiences some very cold days during winter. After a week-long cold spell, the Potomac River itself froze which it rarely does. I knew I wanted to get a shot of the iconic bridge and include the textures of the ice. As sunset transitioned to twilight, the bridge framed the Rosslyn skyline across the Potomac River in Arlington, Virginia. With numb fingers I began the series of images.

This photo is a crop of an eighteen-image stitch, each input image comprised of four bracketed exposures to capture the wide dynamic range of the scene. With the subtle richness of the colors in the clear winter sky, an ethereal mood was set for the bridge spanning the frozen river. I chose to capture this with a mid-range macro lens for its crisp optics and shot a stitched panorama to achieve the depth and composition I envisioned which would have been impossible with a wide-angle lens.

Compositional flexibility aside, the VAST method allows for the high resolution necessary to create an immaculate fine art photographic print at any size. While not my largest panoramic stitch, this was made with eighteen images of an already high-resolution digital camera. The relative enlargements of each input image are minuscule when making a large format photographic print compared to enlarging a single photo so the resulting photo will retain even the smallest details.

I’m fascinated with the technical side and challenge it was to make the image, but most importantly I like the feeling this image provokes. Even on the coldest winter days, the monuments are beautiful to see. The mastery of the stonework ubiquitous in Washington, D.C. always impresses me. I’m glad I tried my luck with the cold and made my way here to capture this fleeting moment in time.

Explore this photo

1,612 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of vineyards covered in snow; landscape photograph created by Duilio Fiorille in Langhe, Cuneo, Italy

Endless Langhe Vineyards

1,612 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Langhe, Cuneo, Italy

The Langhe are an area of excellence in the Piedmont region, located in the North West of italy. Since the Middle Ages, grapes have been cultivated in these areas to make wine and over the centuries the techniques have always improved, up to the very precious current wines.

The Langhe area is very vast and contains a large part of the Province of Cuneo, the capital. An infinite series of hills and slopes, completely planted with vines, all arranged in strict order for kilometers. Wine producers love their land and their vineyards and, especially since the post-war period, they have been able ro recover and create an area that attracts tourists, investors and lovers of good food, refined wines and top-level, renowed and sought-after accomodation facilities, by people who come from all over the world.

In this photo with a resolution of about 1.6 Gigapixels, you can see a very large part of the Langhe, seen from the panoramic terrace of Diano d'Alba, one of the highest and most beautiful villages in the Langhe, which is rightly part of the close circle of the most beautiful villages in Italy (soon I will upload a VASTphoto of this village).

In this photo you can wander with your eyes looking for towers and churches perched on the highest peaks of the hills, the farms with their vineyards, the villages with their roads, in an endless path, all under a soft blanket of snow, abundant in this winter

Explore this photo

The Langhe are an area of excellence in the Piedmont region, located in the North West of italy. Since the Middle Ages, grapes have been cultivated in these areas to make wine and over the centuries the techniques have always improved, up to the very precious current wines.

The Langhe area is very vast and contains a large part of the Province of Cuneo, the capital. An infinite series of hills and slopes, completely planted with vines, all arranged in strict order for kilometers. Wine producers love their land and their vineyards and, especially since the post-war period, they have been able ro recover and create an area that attracts tourists, investors and lovers of good food, refined wines and top-level, renowed and sought-after accomodation facilities, by people who come from all over the world.

In this photo with a resolution of about 1.6 Gigapixels, you can see a very large part of the Langhe, seen from the panoramic terrace of Diano d'Alba, one of the highest and most beautiful villages in the Langhe, which is rightly part of the close circle of the most beautiful villages in Italy (soon I will upload a VASTphoto of this village).

In this photo you can wander with your eyes looking for towers and churches perched on the highest peaks of the hills, the farms with their vineyards, the villages with their roads, in an endless path, all under a soft blanket of snow, abundant in this winter

Explore this photo

1,694 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of a winter landscape scene with snow-covered rocks, evergreen trees, and mountains; landscape photograph created by Scott Dimond in Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada

Snowy Boulder Field

1,694 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada

The Icefields Parkway starts at the townsite of Lake Louise in Banff National Park and travels north to the townsite of Jasper in Jasper National Park. It is a wonderful drive with endless mountain peaks and glaciers to see along the way. This, understandably, makes it a very popular drive in the summer months. In the winter, it can be just as spectacular, however, it is only visited by a comparable few. The road condition can be very poor and huge snow accumulation can sometimes leave people stranded, but winter is by far my favorite time to visit this area.

Just after crossing into Jasper National Park, there is what remains of a massive rockslide. Huge boulders of quartzite dominate the area with only a few trees making footholds amongst them. The various orange, grey, and pink boulders are interesting to explore in summer but once the snow comes, the real transition to the surreal takes place. Once covered in snow, the scene is transformed into a marvel of soft undulating mounds with beautiful shadows and highlights.

On my most recent visit, I was determined to capture this wonder in a way that only VAST images can deliver. I wanted incredible detail and everything in sharp focus from the closest snow crystals in the foreground, to the peaks of the distant mountains. I used specialized equipment and techniques to capture and assemble the image and in the end, I’m very happy with the result. If you can’t visit this location in the winter, I hope this image allows you to experience the beautiful tranquil view it provides.

Explore this photo

The Icefields Parkway starts at the townsite of Lake Louise in Banff National Park and travels north to the townsite of Jasper in Jasper National Park. It is a wonderful drive with endless mountain peaks and glaciers to see along the way. This, understandably, makes it a very popular drive in the summer months. In the winter, it can be just as spectacular, however, it is only visited by a comparable few. The road condition can be very poor and huge snow accumulation can sometimes leave people stranded, but winter is by far my favorite time to visit this area.

Just after crossing into Jasper National Park, there is what remains of a massive rockslide. Huge boulders of quartzite dominate the area with only a few trees making footholds amongst them. The various orange, grey, and pink boulders are interesting to explore in summer but once the snow comes, the real transition to the surreal takes place. Once covered in snow, the scene is transformed into a marvel of soft undulating mounds with beautiful shadows and highlights.

On my most recent visit, I was determined to capture this wonder in a way that only VAST images can deliver. I wanted incredible detail and everything in sharp focus from the closest snow crystals in the foreground, to the peaks of the distant mountains. I used specialized equipment and techniques to capture and assemble the image and in the end, I’m very happy with the result. If you can’t visit this location in the winter, I hope this image allows you to experience the beautiful tranquil view it provides.

Explore this photo

321 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of a mountain at sunset with purple clouds, a forest, and a lake; landscape photograph created by Greg Probst in Lost Lake, Mt. Hood National Forest, Oregon, USA

Moody Mt. Hood

321 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Lost Lake, Mt. Hood National Forest, Oregon

Lost Lake is one of those special little places you go to and all you need to do is just sit there and look at the mountain. If you prefer to fish or swim its great for that or simply walk around the lake but I prefer to sit and stare at this scene.
Mt. Hood is one of many dormant volcanoes in the Cascade Mountains along with Mt. Baker, Mt. Rainier, Mt. Shasta and many more. The natural scenery around them is breath taking and if you get a chance to visit one of them please take the opportunity.

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Lost Lake is one of those special little places you go to and all you need to do is just sit there and look at the mountain. If you prefer to fish or swim its great for that or simply walk around the lake but I prefer to sit and stare at this scene.
Mt. Hood is one of many dormant volcanoes in the Cascade Mountains along with Mt. Baker, Mt. Rainier, Mt. Shasta and many more. The natural scenery around them is breath taking and if you get a chance to visit one of them please take the opportunity.

Explore this photo