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1,612 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of vineyards covered in snow; landscape photograph created by Duilio Fiorille in Langhe, Cuneo, Italy

Endless Langhe Vineyards

1,612 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Langhe, Cuneo, Italy

The Langhe are an area of excellence in the Piedmont region, located in the North West of italy. Since the Middle Ages, grapes have been cultivated in these areas to make wine and over the centuries the techniques have always improved, up to the very precious current wines.

The Langhe area is very vast and contains a large part of the Province of Cuneo, the capital. An infinite series of hills and slopes, completely planted with vines, all arranged in strict order for kilometers. Wine producers love their land and their vineyards and, especially since the post-war period, they have been able ro recover and create an area that attracts tourists, investors and lovers of good food, refined wines and top-level, renowed and sought-after accomodation facilities, by people who come from all over the world.

In this photo with a resolution of about 1.6 Gigapixels, you can see a very large part of the Langhe, seen from the panoramic terrace of Diano d'Alba, one of the highest and most beautiful villages in the Langhe, which is rightly part of the close circle of the most beautiful villages in Italy (soon I will upload a VASTphoto of this village).

In this photo you can wander with your eyes looking for towers and churches perched on the highest peaks of the hills, the farms with their vineyards, the villages with their roads, in an endless path, all under a soft blanket of snow, abundant in this winter

Explore this photo

The Langhe are an area of excellence in the Piedmont region, located in the North West of italy. Since the Middle Ages, grapes have been cultivated in these areas to make wine and over the centuries the techniques have always improved, up to the very precious current wines.

The Langhe area is very vast and contains a large part of the Province of Cuneo, the capital. An infinite series of hills and slopes, completely planted with vines, all arranged in strict order for kilometers. Wine producers love their land and their vineyards and, especially since the post-war period, they have been able ro recover and create an area that attracts tourists, investors and lovers of good food, refined wines and top-level, renowed and sought-after accomodation facilities, by people who come from all over the world.

In this photo with a resolution of about 1.6 Gigapixels, you can see a very large part of the Langhe, seen from the panoramic terrace of Diano d'Alba, one of the highest and most beautiful villages in the Langhe, which is rightly part of the close circle of the most beautiful villages in Italy (soon I will upload a VASTphoto of this village).

In this photo you can wander with your eyes looking for towers and churches perched on the highest peaks of the hills, the farms with their vineyards, the villages with their roads, in an endless path, all under a soft blanket of snow, abundant in this winter

Explore this photo

1,694 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of a winter landscape scene with snow-covered rocks, evergreen trees, and mountains; landscape photograph created by Scott Dimond in Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada

Snowy Boulder Field

1,694 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada

The Icefields Parkway starts at the townsite of Lake Louise in Banff National Park and travels north to the townsite of Jasper in Jasper National Park. It is a wonderful drive with endless mountain peaks and glaciers to see along the way. This, understandably, makes it a very popular drive in the summer months. In the winter, it can be just as spectacular, however, it is only visited by a comparable few. The road condition can be very poor and huge snow accumulation can sometimes leave people stranded, but winter is by far my favorite time to visit this area.

Just after crossing into Jasper National Park, there is what remains of a massive rockslide. Huge boulders of quartzite dominate the area with only a few trees making footholds amongst them. The various orange, grey, and pink boulders are interesting to explore in summer but once the snow comes, the real transition to the surreal takes place. Once covered in snow, the scene is transformed into a marvel of soft undulating mounds with beautiful shadows and highlights.

On my most recent visit, I was determined to capture this wonder in a way that only VAST images can deliver. I wanted incredible detail and everything in sharp focus from the closest snow crystals in the foreground, to the peaks of the distant mountains. I used specialized equipment and techniques to capture and assemble the image and in the end, I’m very happy with the result. If you can’t visit this location in the winter, I hope this image allows you to experience the beautiful tranquil view it provides.

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The Icefields Parkway starts at the townsite of Lake Louise in Banff National Park and travels north to the townsite of Jasper in Jasper National Park. It is a wonderful drive with endless mountain peaks and glaciers to see along the way. This, understandably, makes it a very popular drive in the summer months. In the winter, it can be just as spectacular, however, it is only visited by a comparable few. The road condition can be very poor and huge snow accumulation can sometimes leave people stranded, but winter is by far my favorite time to visit this area.

Just after crossing into Jasper National Park, there is what remains of a massive rockslide. Huge boulders of quartzite dominate the area with only a few trees making footholds amongst them. The various orange, grey, and pink boulders are interesting to explore in summer but once the snow comes, the real transition to the surreal takes place. Once covered in snow, the scene is transformed into a marvel of soft undulating mounds with beautiful shadows and highlights.

On my most recent visit, I was determined to capture this wonder in a way that only VAST images can deliver. I wanted incredible detail and everything in sharp focus from the closest snow crystals in the foreground, to the peaks of the distant mountains. I used specialized equipment and techniques to capture and assemble the image and in the end, I’m very happy with the result. If you can’t visit this location in the winter, I hope this image allows you to experience the beautiful tranquil view it provides.

Explore this photo

321 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of a mountain at sunset with purple clouds, a forest, and a lake; landscape photograph created by Greg Probst in Lost Lake, Mt. Hood National Forest, Oregon, USA

Moody Mt. Hood

321 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Lost Lake, Mt. Hood National Forest, Oregon

Lost Lake is one of those special little places you go to and all you need to do is just sit there and look at the mountain. If you prefer to fish or swim its great for that or simply walk around the lake but I prefer to sit and stare at this scene.
Mt. Hood is one of many dormant volcanoes in the Cascade Mountains along with Mt. Baker, Mt. Rainier, Mt. Shasta and many more. The natural scenery around them is breath taking and if you get a chance to visit one of them please take the opportunity.

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Lost Lake is one of those special little places you go to and all you need to do is just sit there and look at the mountain. If you prefer to fish or swim its great for that or simply walk around the lake but I prefer to sit and stare at this scene.
Mt. Hood is one of many dormant volcanoes in the Cascade Mountains along with Mt. Baker, Mt. Rainier, Mt. Shasta and many more. The natural scenery around them is breath taking and if you get a chance to visit one of them please take the opportunity.

Explore this photo

1,053 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of an abandoned house in a prairie field; landscape photograph created by Scott Dimond in Forty Mile County No. 8, Alberta, Canada

Prairie Remnant #5 (Color)

1,053 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Forty Mile County No. 8, Alberta, Canada

Across the wide-open expanses of the Canadian prairies, hidden down seldom-traveled roads and in isolated locations, sits the remnants of the earlier settlers to these areas. There are old farm equipment and barns to be found but my real quest is always for old abandoned homesteads. These old, empty, and dilapidated homes have always fascinated me, both for their current and changing state and also for what they once were and who lived in them.

When I look at them and their remoteness at the time, I can only think of the resilience of their former occupants. Many were often separated from family and suffered years of hardship and loneliness. There was the endless farming labor during the few warmer months this northern climate has to offer, all with a goal to be prepared to survive the long, cold, and merciless winter that would follow.

Some of these homesteads were simple with rectangular footprints and only a few rooms to house large families. Others were larger with two stories and with the luxury of sitting rooms and fine woodworking. But no matter what end of this spectrum these houses sat, today they are in the same predicament; long abandoned and left to the elements.

And year after year those elements take their toll. Each return visit finds an old home in slightly worse condition or gone completely, often burnt or bulldozed by the landowner, never to be photographed again.

In creating this series of VAST images, I wanted to highlight a select group of characterful abandoned homesteads that remain surrounded only by the crop fields that would have been worked by the first occupants. And at the same time, I wanted to capture what might be the last photograph of them, at the extremely high resolution that only VAST photos can deliver.

Explore this photo

Across the wide-open expanses of the Canadian prairies, hidden down seldom-traveled roads and in isolated locations, sits the remnants of the earlier settlers to these areas. There are old farm equipment and barns to be found but my real quest is always for old abandoned homesteads. These old, empty, and dilapidated homes have always fascinated me, both for their current and changing state and also for what they once were and who lived in them.

When I look at them and their remoteness at the time, I can only think of the resilience of their former occupants. Many were often separated from family and suffered years of hardship and loneliness. There was the endless farming labor during the few warmer months this northern climate has to offer, all with a goal to be prepared to survive the long, cold, and merciless winter that would follow.

Some of these homesteads were simple with rectangular footprints and only a few rooms to house large families. Others were larger with two stories and with the luxury of sitting rooms and fine woodworking. But no matter what end of this spectrum these houses sat, today they are in the same predicament; long abandoned and left to the elements.

And year after year those elements take their toll. Each return visit finds an old home in slightly worse condition or gone completely, often burnt or bulldozed by the landowner, never to be photographed again.

In creating this series of VAST images, I wanted to highlight a select group of characterful abandoned homesteads that remain surrounded only by the crop fields that would have been worked by the first occupants. And at the same time, I wanted to capture what might be the last photograph of them, at the extremely high resolution that only VAST photos can deliver.

Explore this photo

173 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of the Golden Gate Bridge in the fog; photograph created by Justin Katz in Fort Point, Golden Gate Recreation Area, San Francisco, California

Golden Gate Bridge in the Fog

173 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Fort Point, Golden Gate Recreation Area, San Francisco, California

480 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of Turin, Italy at sunset; photograph created by Duilio Fiorille in Punta Ancoccia, Sant

Sunrise over Turin District

480 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Punta Ancoccia, Sant'Ambrogio, Piedmont, Italy

The panorama you see in this photo of mine portrays a very large area: the mountains in the background are more than 150 km away from the shooting point.

In a single glance you can see a large part of the western province of Turin, the capital of Piedmont, a region in the north west of Italy, whose name means "At the foot of the mountains".

In the foreground, the City of Avigliana with its medieval fortress, now reduced to ruins, is clearly visible, while in the background the City of Turin (about 900,000 inhabitants) immersed in the morning fog is visible. The tallest buildings in the city stand out (the Mole Antonelliana, symbol of the city, the two recent skyscrapers and other important buildings).

In the background, however, there is the hill that surrounds the city, with the highest point reaching 700 meters. On the hill the Basilica of Superga stands out, visible right in front of the area where the sun rises, while further to the right the Maddalene lighthouse, surrounded by telecommunications antennas.

On the right of the photo there are instead the countryside of the nearby province of Cuneo (the Langhe) with the slopes that reach the Ligurian Apennines in the background (behind these mountains there is Liguria with its Ligurian Sea).

In the photo there are very fine details: houses, buildings, cars and trains in motion, even the people waiting for the train to arrive at the train station. The unexpected light of dawn made the image even more impressive.

Explore this photo

The panorama you see in this photo of mine portrays a very large area: the mountains in the background are more than 150 km away from the shooting point.

In a single glance you can see a large part of the western province of Turin, the capital of Piedmont, a region in the north west of Italy, whose name means "At the foot of the mountains".

In the foreground, the City of Avigliana with its medieval fortress, now reduced to ruins, is clearly visible, while in the background the City of Turin (about 900,000 inhabitants) immersed in the morning fog is visible. The tallest buildings in the city stand out (the Mole Antonelliana, symbol of the city, the two recent skyscrapers and other important buildings).

In the background, however, there is the hill that surrounds the city, with the highest point reaching 700 meters. On the hill the Basilica of Superga stands out, visible right in front of the area where the sun rises, while further to the right the Maddalene lighthouse, surrounded by telecommunications antennas.

On the right of the photo there are instead the countryside of the nearby province of Cuneo (the Langhe) with the slopes that reach the Ligurian Apennines in the background (behind these mountains there is Liguria with its Ligurian Sea).

In the photo there are very fine details: houses, buildings, cars and trains in motion, even the people waiting for the train to arrive at the train station. The unexpected light of dawn made the image even more impressive.

Explore this photo

310 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of the San Francisco skyline at sunset; cityscape photograph created by Justin Katz in San Francisco, California

San Francisco Silhouette at Sunset

310 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
San Francisco, California

408 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of vineyards and wine grapes; photograph created by Justin Katz in Yountville, Napa Valley, California

Napa Sunrise Through the Vineyards

408 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Yountville, Napa Valley, California

629 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of the San Francisco Skyline from Treasure Island at sunset; cityscape photograph created by Justin Katz in Treasure Island, San Francisco, California

San Francisco Skyline from Treasure Island

629 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Treasure Island, San Francisco, California

362 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of the Golden Gate Bridge at sunset; landscape photograph created by Justin Katz in Golden Gate Bridge, San Francisco, California

Golden Gate Bridge Sunset

362 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Golden Gate Bridge, San Francisco, California

94 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of Mt. Rainier at sunset with the moon; landscape photograph created by Greg Probst in Mt. Rainier National Park

Sunset And Moonrise At Mt. Rainier

94 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Mount Rainier National Park, Washington

Mt. Rainier has so many different faces, this one is the northwest face looking to the southeast. The day had started out with some valley fog and some white fluffy cumulus clouds and I was hoping for some evening color when I started the roughly 3 mile hike to this part of the trail. By the time I got to this point the cumulus clouds had all but vanished leaving the low valley fog for character. When I was setting up to start making images a couple walked back down from the ridge and asked if I had seen the two bears? I guess one was on the ridge where they were and the other was foraging along the shoreline of the lake eating wild berries. I used my binoculars to find the one along the lake shore where I had been 20 minutes earlier. The bears I have come across in Mt. Rainier in the Fall have been to busy stuffing themselves to be bothered with people.
If you look to the far right of this image you will see Mt. St. Helens on the horizon which erupted in 1980. Yes, I had to squint to see it too but it's there. Its funny what you"ll see in an image when you look.
The moon rise was a total surprise to me, I had forgotten what day of the month it was and when it rose over the horizon looking like it would arch right over the summit I was stunned to be in the right place at the right time by chance.

Explore this photo

Mt. Rainier has so many different faces, this one is the northwest face looking to the southeast. The day had started out with some valley fog and some white fluffy cumulus clouds and I was hoping for some evening color when I started the roughly 3 mile hike to this part of the trail. By the time I got to this point the cumulus clouds had all but vanished leaving the low valley fog for character. When I was setting up to start making images a couple walked back down from the ridge and asked if I had seen the two bears? I guess one was on the ridge where they were and the other was foraging along the shoreline of the lake eating wild berries. I used my binoculars to find the one along the lake shore where I had been 20 minutes earlier. The bears I have come across in Mt. Rainier in the Fall have been to busy stuffing themselves to be bothered with people.
If you look to the far right of this image you will see Mt. St. Helens on the horizon which erupted in 1980. Yes, I had to squint to see it too but it's there. Its funny what you"ll see in an image when you look.
The moon rise was a total surprise to me, I had forgotten what day of the month it was and when it rose over the horizon looking like it would arch right over the summit I was stunned to be in the right place at the right time by chance.

Explore this photo

172 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of Mount Rainier and the moon at sunset; landscape photograph created by Greg Probst in Mount Rainier National Park, Washington

Moonrise Over Rainier

172 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Mount Rainier National Park, Washington

Mt. Rainier above it all, its the highest point in Washington and 2nd tallest in the lower 48 states and there it is right there in front of me, eyeball to eyeball. The nearly 3 mile hike into this location gives you no insight as to what the view will be, its all forest and you see nothing but trees until you get to Eunice Lake and presto there it is.
The valley fog in this scene would rise and fall with the wind currents and basically tease me as to what might happen as the sun dipped low. The clarity and color of the air makes this image so absolutely sharp. When I was going through the image and looking for anything wrong I found I was looking for climbers, I've seen them in other images so now I look, sorry there aren't any but if you find any please let me know.

Explore this photo

Mt. Rainier above it all, its the highest point in Washington and 2nd tallest in the lower 48 states and there it is right there in front of me, eyeball to eyeball. The nearly 3 mile hike into this location gives you no insight as to what the view will be, its all forest and you see nothing but trees until you get to Eunice Lake and presto there it is.
The valley fog in this scene would rise and fall with the wind currents and basically tease me as to what might happen as the sun dipped low. The clarity and color of the air makes this image so absolutely sharp. When I was going through the image and looking for anything wrong I found I was looking for climbers, I've seen them in other images so now I look, sorry there aren't any but if you find any please let me know.

Explore this photo

863 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of an abandoned house in a prairie; landscape photograph created by Scott Dimond in

Prairie Remnant #3

863 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO

Across the wide-open expanses of the Canadian prairies, hidden down seldom-traveled roads and in isolated locations, sits the remnants of the earlier settlers to these areas. There are old farm equipment and barns to be found but my real quest is always for old abandoned homesteads. These old, empty, and dilapidated homes have always fascinated me, both for their current and changing state and also for what they once were and who lived in them.

When I look at them and their remoteness at the time, I can only think of the resilience of their former occupants. Many were often separated from family and suffered years of hardship and loneliness. There was the endless farming labor during the few warmer months this northern climate has to offer, all with a goal to be prepared to survive the long, cold, and merciless winter that would follow.

Some of these homesteads were simple with rectangular footprints and only a few rooms to house large families. Others were larger with two stories and with the luxury of sitting rooms and fine woodworking. But no matter what end of this spectrum these houses sat, today they are in the same predicament; long abandoned and left to the elements.

And year after year those elements take their toll. Each return visit finds an old home in slightly worse condition or gone completely, often burnt or bulldozed by the landowner, never to be photographed again.

In creating this series of VAST images, I wanted to highlight a select group of characterful abandoned homesteads that remain surrounded only by the crop fields that would have been worked by the first occupants. And at the same time, I wanted to capture what might be the last photograph of them, at the extremely high resolution that only VAST photos can deliver.

Explore this photo

Across the wide-open expanses of the Canadian prairies, hidden down seldom-traveled roads and in isolated locations, sits the remnants of the earlier settlers to these areas. There are old farm equipment and barns to be found but my real quest is always for old abandoned homesteads. These old, empty, and dilapidated homes have always fascinated me, both for their current and changing state and also for what they once were and who lived in them.

When I look at them and their remoteness at the time, I can only think of the resilience of their former occupants. Many were often separated from family and suffered years of hardship and loneliness. There was the endless farming labor during the few warmer months this northern climate has to offer, all with a goal to be prepared to survive the long, cold, and merciless winter that would follow.

Some of these homesteads were simple with rectangular footprints and only a few rooms to house large families. Others were larger with two stories and with the luxury of sitting rooms and fine woodworking. But no matter what end of this spectrum these houses sat, today they are in the same predicament; long abandoned and left to the elements.

And year after year those elements take their toll. Each return visit finds an old home in slightly worse condition or gone completely, often burnt or bulldozed by the landowner, never to be photographed again.

In creating this series of VAST images, I wanted to highlight a select group of characterful abandoned homesteads that remain surrounded only by the crop fields that would have been worked by the first occupants. And at the same time, I wanted to capture what might be the last photograph of them, at the extremely high resolution that only VAST photos can deliver.

Explore this photo

232 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of a homestead; black & white landscape photograph created by Scott Dimond in Pincher Creek No. 9, Alberta, Canada

Prairie Remnant #4

232 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Pincher Creek No. 9, Alberta, Canada

Across the wide-open expanses of the Canadian prairies, hidden down seldom-traveled roads and in isolated locations, sits the remnants of the earlier settlers to these areas. There are old farm equipment and barns to be found but my real quest is always for old abandoned homesteads. These old, empty, and dilapidated homes have always fascinated me, both for their current and changing state and also for what they once were and who lived in them.

When I look at them and their remoteness at the time, I can only think of the resilience of their former occupants. Many were often separated from family and suffered years of hardship and loneliness. There was the endless farming labor during the few warmer months this northern climate has to offer, all with a goal to be prepared to survive the long, cold, and merciless winter that would follow.

Some of these homesteads were simple with rectangular footprints and only a few rooms to house large families. Others were larger with two stories and with the luxury of sitting rooms and fine woodworking. But no matter what end of this spectrum these houses sat, today they are in the same predicament; long abandoned and left to the elements.

And year after year those elements take their toll. Each return visit finds an old home in slightly worse condition or gone completely, often burnt or bulldozed by the landowner, never to be photographed again.

In creating this series of VAST images, I wanted to highlight a select group of characterful abandoned homesteads that remain surrounded only by the crop fields that would have been worked by the first occupants. And at the same time, I wanted to capture what might be the last photograph of them, at the extremely high resolution that only VAST photos can deliver.

Explore this photo

Across the wide-open expanses of the Canadian prairies, hidden down seldom-traveled roads and in isolated locations, sits the remnants of the earlier settlers to these areas. There are old farm equipment and barns to be found but my real quest is always for old abandoned homesteads. These old, empty, and dilapidated homes have always fascinated me, both for their current and changing state and also for what they once were and who lived in them.

When I look at them and their remoteness at the time, I can only think of the resilience of their former occupants. Many were often separated from family and suffered years of hardship and loneliness. There was the endless farming labor during the few warmer months this northern climate has to offer, all with a goal to be prepared to survive the long, cold, and merciless winter that would follow.

Some of these homesteads were simple with rectangular footprints and only a few rooms to house large families. Others were larger with two stories and with the luxury of sitting rooms and fine woodworking. But no matter what end of this spectrum these houses sat, today they are in the same predicament; long abandoned and left to the elements.

And year after year those elements take their toll. Each return visit finds an old home in slightly worse condition or gone completely, often burnt or bulldozed by the landowner, never to be photographed again.

In creating this series of VAST images, I wanted to highlight a select group of characterful abandoned homesteads that remain surrounded only by the crop fields that would have been worked by the first occupants. And at the same time, I wanted to capture what might be the last photograph of them, at the extremely high resolution that only VAST photos can deliver.

Explore this photo

232 megapixels! A very high resolution, large-format VAST photo print of a house on a prairie; landscape photograph created by Scott Dimond in Pincher Creek No. 9, Alberta, Canada

Prairie Remnant #4 (Color)

232 MEGAPIXEL VAST PHOTO
Pincher Creek No. 9, Alberta, Canada

Across the wide-open expanses of the Canadian prairies, hidden down seldom-traveled roads and in isolated locations, sits the remnants of the earlier settlers to these areas. There are old farm equipment and barns to be found but my real quest is always for old abandoned homesteads. These old, empty, and dilapidated homes have always fascinated me, both for their current and changing state and also for what they once were and who lived in them.

When I look at them and their remoteness at the time, I can only think of the resilience of their former occupants. Many were often separated from family and suffered years of hardship and loneliness. There was the endless farming labor during the few warmer months this northern climate has to offer, all with a goal to be prepared to survive the long, cold, and merciless winter that would follow.

Some of these homesteads were simple with rectangular footprints and only a few rooms to house large families. Others were larger with two stories and with the luxury of sitting rooms and fine woodworking. But no matter what end of this spectrum these houses sat, today they are in the same predicament; long abandoned and left to the elements.

And year after year those elements take their toll. Each return visit finds an old home in slightly worse condition or gone completely, often burnt or bulldozed by the landowner, never to be photographed again.

In creating this series of VAST images, I wanted to highlight a select group of characterful abandoned homesteads that remain surrounded only by the crop fields that would have been worked by the first occupants. And at the same time, I wanted to capture what might be the last photograph of them, at the extremely high resolution that only VAST photos can deliver.

Explore this photo

Across the wide-open expanses of the Canadian prairies, hidden down seldom-traveled roads and in isolated locations, sits the remnants of the earlier settlers to these areas. There are old farm equipment and barns to be found but my real quest is always for old abandoned homesteads. These old, empty, and dilapidated homes have always fascinated me, both for their current and changing state and also for what they once were and who lived in them.

When I look at them and their remoteness at the time, I can only think of the resilience of their former occupants. Many were often separated from family and suffered years of hardship and loneliness. There was the endless farming labor during the few warmer months this northern climate has to offer, all with a goal to be prepared to survive the long, cold, and merciless winter that would follow.

Some of these homesteads were simple with rectangular footprints and only a few rooms to house large families. Others were larger with two stories and with the luxury of sitting rooms and fine woodworking. But no matter what end of this spectrum these houses sat, today they are in the same predicament; long abandoned and left to the elements.

And year after year those elements take their toll. Each return visit finds an old home in slightly worse condition or gone completely, often burnt or bulldozed by the landowner, never to be photographed again.

In creating this series of VAST images, I wanted to highlight a select group of characterful abandoned homesteads that remain surrounded only by the crop fields that would have been worked by the first occupants. And at the same time, I wanted to capture what might be the last photograph of them, at the extremely high resolution that only VAST photos can deliver.

Explore this photo